SEC Broadens Constitutional Inquiry into Its Own Administrative Judges in Timbervest Case

On May 27, 2015, the SEC agreed to expand its own consideration of constitutionality challenges to its administrative law adjudicative process.  It issued an order asking for further briefing on whether the appointment of its administrative law judges conforms to the Constitution’s Appointments Clause.  The order, which was issued in the administrative proceeding In the Matter of Timbervest LLC et al., File No. 3-15519, is laid out below.  We previously discussed the briefing of constitutional issues before the SEC in the Timbervest case here: Briefing of ALJ Constitutionality Before SEC Leaves Resolution in Doubt.

This new development was set in motion by the May 7, 2015 Wall Street Journal article by Jean Eaglesham reporting on questions being raised about the fairness and constitutionality of the SEC’s use of its own administrative courts to prosecute securities enforcement actions for severe penalties, especially against people who were not otherwise subject to SEC regulatory oversight.  See Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal.  Among other things, that article quoted a former SEC administrative law judge about pressure that had been placed on her to favor the SEC in her rulings.  That revelation spurred respondents in SEC actions to seek further information from the SEC about possible bias or other taints to the SEC’s administrative law proceedings.  In the proceeding In the Matter of Charles L. Hill, Jr., administrative law judge James Grimes approved a subpoena to the SEC staff for the production of documents relating to the matters discussed in the Wall Street Journal article.  See SEC ALJ James Grimes Issues Important Discovery Order Against SEC.  The respondents in the Timbervest proceeding, which is now under review by the Commission itself after an Initial Decision against the respondents by ALJ Cameron Elliot, also asked for discovery into the matters raised in the WSJ article in a filing that can be read here: Respondents’ Motion To Allow Submission of Additional Evidence and Motion for Leave To Adduce Additional Evidence.  That led to the May 27 SEC order:

On May 20, 2015, Respondents filed a Motion to Allow Submission of Additional Evidence and for Leave to Adduce Additional Evidence.  Based on that motion, the Respondents now appear to be asserting that the manner of appointment of the administrative law judges who presided over this matter violates the Appointments Clause of the Constitution.

The Commission’s consideration of the Appointments Clause challenge would be assisted by the submission of additional material for inclusion in the record and by the submission of additional briefing.

Accordingly, it is ORDERED that the Division of Enforcement shall by June 4, 2015 file and serve on the parties an affidavit from an appropriate Commission staff member, with supporting exhibits if appropriate, setting forth the manner in which ALJ Cameron Elliot and Chief ALJ Brenda Murray were hired, including the method of selection and appointment.

It is further ORDERED that the parties shall file simultaneous supplemental briefs . . . limited to the following two issues: (1) whether, assuming solely for the sake of argument that the Commission’s ALJs are “inferior officers” within the meaning of Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 of the Constitution, their manner of appointment violates the Appointments Clause; and (2) the appropriate remedy if such a violation is found.

In a footnote, the Commission said it was not yet deciding the Timbervest motion, including “the materiality of the discovery sought.”  The order in its entirety can be found here: Order Requesting Additional Submissions and Additional Briefing.

The SEC is treading carefully here.  We know, of course, that there is no chance the Commission will rule that its own administrative proceedings are unconstitutional in any respect, but Mary Jo White is a good enough lawyer to know she has to make a record that will not undercut the appearance of fairness in this entire process, or suggest any SEC bias in its own favor.  Just saying that shows how absurd the process is: the SEC is obviously conflicted in considering whether the prosecutions it sent to its administrative judges are unconstitutional.  That, among other reasons, is why this issue needs to be thrashed out fully before actual Article III judges in Article III courts.  Nevertheless, federal district court judges, with one exception, have ruled they lack the jurisdiction to consider the issue.  See Court Dismisses “Compelling and Meritorious” Bebo Constitutional Claims Solely on Jurisdictional Grounds; SEC Wins First Skirmish on Constitutional Challenge to Chau Administrative Proceeding.  The one exception led to a decision in the SEC’s favor that lacked the substance to serve as a compelling precedent: see In Duka v. SEC, SDNY Judge Berman Finds SEC Administrative Law Enforcement Proceedings Constitutional in a Less than Compelling Opinion.

The revelation of possible pressure on SEC ALJs to favor the SEC would be a game-changer if it is substantiated.  That introduces new elements of due process and fundamental fairness concerns beyond the separation of powers and appointments clause issues that have been the focus of most of the challenges to date.  How the Commission could question the “materiality” of that information is hard to fathom.  As we previously wrote, the only appropriate response to such a “red flag” is to commence a fully independent review of issue.  That is, of course, what the SEC would demand if a similar event were to occur in a public company, in order to avoid a later charge by the SEC and its staff of “reckless disregard” of “red flags.”  But apparently different rules govern the Commission, which seems to be placing itself above the law.

Straight Arrow

May 28, 2015

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6 thoughts on “SEC Broadens Constitutional Inquiry into Its Own Administrative Judges in Timbervest Case

  1. Pingback: SEC Strengthens Appointments Clause Challenge to ALJs by Admitting It Was Not Responsbile for at Least One ALJ Appointment | Securities Diary

  2. Pingback: SEC Strengthens Appointments Clause Challenge to ALJs by Admitting It Was Not Responsible for at Least One ALJ Appointment | Securities Diary

  3. Pingback: SEC “Invites” ALJ Cameron Elliot To Provide Affidavit on Conversations “Similar” to Those Described by Former ALJ | Securities Diary

  4. Pingback: Court Issues Preliminary Injunction Halting Likely Unconstitutional SEC Proceeding | Securities Diary

  5. Pingback: Timbervest Files Complaint and TRO Motion To Halt SEC Proceeding | Securities Diary

  6. Pingback: 7th Circuit Rules for SEC, Affirming Dismissal of Bebo Case on Jurisdictional Grounds | Securities Diary

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