SEC Gambit To Avoid Judge May in Timbervest Case Seems To Have Failed

We previously wrote about the SEC’s desperate effort to avoid the assignment of Timbervest, LLC v. SEC, Civil Action No. 1:15-CV-2106 (N.D. Ga.), to District Judge Leigh Martin May.  See SEC, Desperate To Avoid Judge May, Challenges Related Case Designation in Timbervest Action and SEC Argues Common “Facts” Are Not Common “Issues of Fact” — I Kid You Not.  You recall that Judge May ruled in Hill v. SEC that the appointment of SEC ALJ James Grimes violated the appointments clause of Article II of the Constitution — see Court Issues Preliminary Injunction Halting Likely Unconstitutional SEC Proceeding.

Well, it appears that the SEC’s motion challenging the “related case” assignment of the Timbervest action to Judge May failed.  There is no order in the docket denying the motion, but a recent scheduling order issued by Judge May suggests she will continue to preside over the case.  See Timbervest v. SEC Scheduling Order.  In the Order, Judge May states that the SEC must respond to plaintiffs’ Motion for a Temporary Restraining Order and/or Preliminary Injunction by June 29, plaintiffs must file a reply brief by July 16, and “the parties will attend a hearing in this matter a hearing” on July 21, in Courtroom 2107.  Courtroom 2107 is listed in the N.D. Georgia directory as Judge May’s courtroom.

In the meantime, in the SEC administrative case brought against Gray Financial Group, In the Matter of Gray Financial Group, Inc. et al., File No. 3-16554, SEC ALJ Cameron Elliot declined to issue a stay of proceedings in response to an unopposed motion founded on the pending federal action for injunctive relief by Gray Financial in the same Georgia federal court, which was also assigned to Judge May.  He said: “Commission Rule of Practice 161 instructs that I ‘should adhere to a policy of strongly disfavoring’ stay requests unless ‘the requesting party makes a strong showing that the denial of the request or motion would substantially prejudice their case.’  17 C.F.R. § 201.161(b)(1).  Respondents have not made such a showing.  I will abide by an injunction if it is issued; however, as of now I have been instructed to resolve this proceeding within 300 days of service of the OIP.”  See Order Denying Unopposed Motion To Stay Administrative Proceeding Against Gray Financial Group.

So, chaos still reigns, and apparently the SEC is unsure about how best to bring it under control.  See SEC Rejects Easy Answers To Admin Court Challenges.  In that article, Law 360’s Stephanie Russell-Kraft reported on a discussion between Judge Richard Berman and a DOJ lawyer representing the SEC.  Judge Berman asked whether, in light of comments by Judge May that it might be easy to cure the appointments clause violation, the similar claims brought before him by Barbara Duka (in Duka v. SEC) could be resolved simply by having the Commission reappoint its current ALJs.  The DOJ lawyer declined to address whether that could be done, leading to the following colloquy:

“Is the commission opposed to an easy fix?” Judge Berman asked.

“The Department of Justice is very actively considering the best litigation approach to address this issue,” Lin answered.

“I’m asking you if [appointing the judges] would solve this issue,” Judge Berman pressed, pointing out that the case pending before him had nothing to do with the SEC’s litigation strategy.

“It’s not like if we pursue one of these options this case or other cases will go away,” Lin answered, adding that changing the way it appoints its judges is not a “meaningful way” to address Judge May’s decisions or a “practical way” for it to approach its long-standing administrative court scheme.

“The commission has to consider all the cases it has,” she said later, to which Judge Berman replied, “I don’t.”

Meanwhile, the SEC’s administrative proceeding against Laurie Bebo continues to be tried, even while the appeal of Ms. Bebo’s injunctive action moves forward in the Seventh Circuit.

The ship is plainly adrift.

Straight Arrow

June 23, 2015

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