Why the SEC’s Proposed Changes to Its Rules of Practice Are Woefully Inadequate — Part II

Today we present Part II of our discussion on the proposed changes offered by the SEC to the Rules of Practice governing its administrative proceedings.  Those proposals can be reviewed here.  They purported to be an effort to modernize rules adopted many years ago, long before significant changes to both the nature of litigated proceedings (based primarily on the enormous increase in evidentiary material available in the digital era), and the nature of the specific proceedings before the SEC’s administrative courts (based on jurisdictional changes over time, most recently the addition of new authority under the Dodd-Frank Act).

The proposals are patently inadequate to address the current problems in the administrative court, virtually all of which have the effect of tilting those proceedings against respondents and in favor of the prosecutor, which is the SEC’s Division of Enforcement.  The reasons why the current procedural rules are unfair have been discussed at length over the past two years, including on several occasions in this blog.  (See Ceresney Presents Unconvincing Defense of Increased SEC Administrative Prosecutions, and Opposition Growing to SEC’s New “Star Chamber” Administrative Prosecutions.)  The reasons why these proposed changes fail to come close to solving those fairness problems are the subject of the multi-part discussions here.

In Part I, we described one of the more blatant flaws in the proposal, by which the SEC actually seeks to increase the advantage the Division of Enforcement has in the administrative court versus federal court proceedings – the proposed new requirement that in their Answers, respondents must disclose certain defense theories even though they are not “affirmative defenses,” including defenses based on “reliance.”  See Why the SEC’s Proposed Changes to Its Rules of Practice Are Woefully Inadequate — Part I.

Today we address another one of the major shortcomings of the new proposal – the proposed limits on depositions of witnesses or potential witnesses.  The proposal is described by the SEC as follows:

Rule 233 currently permits parties to take depositions by oral examination only if a witness will be unable to attend or testify at a hearing.  The proposed amendment would allow respondents and the Division to file notices to take depositions.  If a proceeding involves a single respondent, the proposed amendment would allow the respondent and the Division to each file notices to depose three persons (i.e., a maximum of three depositions per side) in proceedings designated in the proposal as 120-day cases (known as 300-day cases under current Rule 360).  If a proceeding involves multiple respondents, the proposed amendment would allow respondents to collectively file notices to depose five persons and the Division to file notices to depose five persons in proceedings designated in the proposal as 120-day cases (i.e., a maximum of five depositions per side).  Under the amendment, parties also could request that the hearing officer issue a subpoena for documents in conjunction with the deposition.

This proposal lacks any reasoned support — and really any attempt to provide reasoned support.  It ignores historic practices in federal courts, which have had to address this issue for many years.  Instead of adopting a flexible set of principles or guidelines that can be applied in different ways under varying facts and circumstances, it picks a magic number of depositions that applies to all cases without regard to variations in cases.  But alas, the magic of the number is never described.  And it makes assumptions about how the magic number is to be applied that (a) fly in the face of reality, and (b) act as a potential severe hardship on the defense when there are multiple defending respondents, without any discussion whatsoever of those issues.  The only apparent guiding principle is to assure that the SEC staff’s well-known — and now documented (see Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal) — advantage in the administrative court will continue.  The proposal is successful in only one respect: it provides a textbook case of arbitrary and capricious rulemaking.

Where the Parties Start Matters

To evaluate this proposal, we need to consider some context.  We need to understand that when an enforcement proceeding of any type – judicial or administrative – begins, the parties are not even close to equally prepared to litigate the case.  That is because one party – the Division of Enforcement – has already been gathering and examining evidence for years, while those accused of violating the law have had very limited access to information, and have been focused on avoiding an enforcement action, not litigating one.  Any set of litigation rules that ignores this basic fact is destined to be biased in favor of the party given a multi-year head start.

An SEC enforcement proceeding, whether brought in federal court or the SEC’s administrative court, occurs only after an extensive investigation by the Division of Enforcement.  That investigation may last years, and usually does.  In that investigation, the SEC staff has virtually unlimited subpoena power, both to seek documents to obtain sworn investigative testimony from anyone the staff chooses.  It is not unusual for serious investigations involving contested issues to go on for more than three years.  Lots of documents may be produced – in corporate cases, often millions of pages of materials are produced to the SEC by various parties.  Many persons may be required to testify – 15 to 30 would not be unusual – and several of them will be required to testify on multiple occasions.  In addition to this, the SEC staff will interview other witnesses or potential witnesses without recording their testimony.

The “investigative testimony” is controlled by the SEC staff.  It often is not clear whether individuals are being targeted for possible action, and if so, which ones.  As a result, witnesses are vulnerable to manipulation because their objective is to avoid being accused of violations, and they are concerned that appearing combative and “pushing back” on questions will undercut that goal.  And manipulation does occur.  Witnesses may be (and are) bombarded by questions from several examiners at once; questions may be (and are) leading; questions may be (and are) deceptive, in an effort to induce responses the staff may be looking for; witnesses are not given advance access to materials to allow them refresh their memory or think about (or look for) other relevant materials that could place documents in their proper context; the examiners pick and choose the exhibits they use, and often do so as a means of influencing the testimony (e.g., they will use an email out of context when the broader context shows the content in a very different light); the examiners may (and do) suggest answers and pressure witnesses to change their testimony when the answers they receive do not match their perceptions or contentions; and the examiners do not typically pursue lines of examination designed gather information about defenses to possible violations.  Defense counsel is given an opportunity to ask questions, but without access to the evidence is limited in doing so.  The end result of these examinations is often a transcript of testimony that is designed to support the staff’s “going in” theory of violations of law that they are considering to pursue with the Commission.

[To those who may be skeptical that these questionable practices really occur, I can only say that I witnessed each of them on many occasions as a practicing securities defense counsel.  Not all SEC enforcement staff lawyers do these things, but many do, and they are not subject to meaningful controls by their supervisors.]

The only outside person who may be given a copy of testimony by the staff is the person testifying.  Even that occurs under rules set by the SEC, and a transcript can be denied to a witness if the staff objects, although that is rare.  Only to the extent that witnesses agree to share transcripts might they be able to get an understanding of the testimony of other witnesses.  That often occurs among witnesses with parallel interests, but it is rare that those being investigated have anything approaching a complete record of what people said before a case is brought.

When a case is brought, the SEC staff turns over to the accused what they consider to be non-privileged portions of the formal investigative file.  That normally includes all transcripts of investigative testimony, and all documents obtained by subpoena or other staff solicitations, but not records of witness interviews or compilations of relevant materials gleaned from all of the produced documents, which the staff almost always treats as privileged.  The investigative file is also narrowly defined as the materials specifically developed for the case against the accused.  It does not include other relevant documents that may be in the SEC’s possession that were obtained in other ways – perhaps, for example, in the course of other investigations on the same general subject matter.  For example, if the SEC staff is investigating a particular accounting practice and decides to bring an enforcement action alleging the practice was wrong, or even fraudulent, the “investigative file” produced would exclude all materials the SEC gathered about the use of that same accounting practice by other persons, whether or not they might provide valuable evidence in the specific proceeding brought.  But the SEC staff always has access to that additional data to the extent they choose to use it.

As noted, the SEC staff is typically involved in an investigation for years.  But the persons sued learn that they are targets only when they are asked for a “Wells Submission” (or sometimes a “pre-Wells Submission”). (A pre-Wells Submission is a relatively recent practice in which the staff advises a target of a potential action and gives an opportunity to respond, but does not label it a so-called “Wells Call.”  That happens because many companies now treat the formal request for a Wells Submission as an event that should be disclosed publicly, and even the SEC staff understands that it might be irresponsible to take steps requiring the public disclosure of possible violations identified in the midst of an investigative process.)  The Wells Submission process is one in which the staff informs targets of its conclusion that violations of law occurred and intent to seek approval from the Commission to prosecute, describes the alleged violations, and gives the accused persons a chance to prepare a submission that would accompany that memorandum to the Commission.  In practice, the Wells (or pre-Wells) Submission also serves as the first chance for a target to try to convince the staff that he or she did not violate the law as alleged by the staff.  The Wells Submission process is mandatory – the staff cannot avoid it.  But when the Wells Submission is drafted, the accused only has access to whatever materials he or she has been able to gather without any subpoena authority – either from those that may have submitted them to the SEC, if they choose to share them, or those the SEC staff agrees to allow them to see.

(As an aside, historically, Wells Submissions “back in the day” were often helpful in convincing the staff not to move forward with the charges, or least to mitigate them.  But in more recent years, Wells Submissions are much less likely to succeed at avoiding a proceeding along the lines originally proposed by the staff.  In fact, many experienced members of the securities defense bar now advise that no submission be made because it mostly provides the staff with a roadmap of a future defense of the accused.)

The end result is that when an enforcement proceeding is commenced, the SEC staff has already, usually for several years, been: (1) reviewing a large amount of relevant evidence; (2) developing an “investigative record” molded to support their charges; (3) producing witness testimony that often is slanted in favor of the staff’s theories because of the way those examinations are conducted; (4) gathering information about likely testimony of potential additional witnesses in secret interviews that are not transcribed; and (5) obtaining information about the likely defenses of the accused violators through the Wells Submission process.  In contrast, the accused violators have limited information. Indeed, in many cases, their defense counsel was often not even involved in the investigation because it was not until a late stage (a Wells Call) that the actual targets were identified, and often only at that time do they obtain separate counsel to defend the threatened case against them.

The SEC’s New Proposed Discovery Rules Are Plainly Unfair

This context makes it painfully clear that the current discovery provisions for administrative proceedings in the SEC’s Rules of Practice are designed to handcuff defense counsel and prevent a fair opportunity to develop a reasonable defense.  We won’t here belabor the shortcomings of those existing rules.  The facts speak for themselves.  Defense counsel are given an extremely limited period to learn the record and develop a defense, even in cases in which millions of pages of documents were produced, and the SEC staff has had years to sift through and analyze them. Defense counsel has no right to depose any witness except in very limited circumstances.  Investigative transcripts are typically admitted into evidence with no right to cross examination on the fiction that they provide a reliable picture of the facts.  The SEC staff is rarely required to provide access to its non-transcribed interviews, and often is not even required even to identify the people that were interviewed.  Relevant evidence in the SEC’s possession is rarely required to be produced if it lies outside the narrow confines of the so-called “investigative record,” even when the SEC staff has access to plainly relevant materials located elsewhere.  None of these limitations applies if the case is brought in federal court.

The new proposed rules do almost nothing to remedy this.  They allow an arbitrary number of depositions that is divorced from any analysis of what cases really require, and from any recognition that these are far from “one size fits all” cases.  They allow only modest and plainly insufficient increases in time to prepare the case for trial.  The periods chosen fail to take account of the fact that the SEC staff has years to prepare a case and the defense merely months.  They also reflect no effort to analyze the trial preparation needs of these cases in federal courts, at least as a baseline for figuring out what might be reasonable in the administrative forum.  Amazingly, no effort is made to analyze whether the demonstrable advantage the SEC staff has in access to evidence and witnesses, and in preparation time, may impact the fairness of the proceedings.  These failures are quintessential examples of arbitrary and capricious decision-making under the Administrative Procedure Act.

This post is focused on the inadequacy of the proposed revisions to Rule of Practice 233 with regard to the provision for depositions.  The proposed new Rule 233 would allow depositions as follows:

(1) “If the proceeding involves a single respondent . . . , the respondent may file written notices to depose no more than three persons, and the Division of Enforcement may file written notices to depose no more than three persons”; and

(2) “If the proceeding involves multiple respondents, the respondents collectively may file joint written notices to depose no more than five persons, and the Division of Enforcement may file written notices to depose no more than five persons. The depositions . . . shall not exceed a total of five depositions for the Division of Enforcement, and five depositions for all respondents collectively.”

This proposed provision is arbitrary, capricious, and blatantly unfair in several respects.

First, without any consideration or analysis of the imbalance between the SEC staff and the respondents in case preparation and access to evidence and potential witnesses, it assumes that the SEC staff and the respondents (as a group) should be entitled to an equal number of depositions.  By ignoring the fact that the SEC staff previously had access to many witnesses, perhaps on multiple occasions, and the defense had no such access, the proposal’s determination that an equal number of depositions for the prosecution and defense is appropriate is purely arbitrary, lacking any supporting analysis or explanation.  Indeed, it is not clear, nor discussed, why the SEC staff needs to take any depositions after having had unrestricted access to subpoenaed, sworn witness testimony during the entire investigative process.

Second, apart from that fundamental shortcoming, the determination that in cases with multiple respondents, the SEC staff should be entitled to five depositions while the respondents as a group must split five depositions (i) lacks any basis or analysis; (ii) places respondents in a position of having to compete for limited depositions without any discussion of why this is appropriate; (iii) assumes – without support in either theory or common practice – that the respondents as a group will be able to agree on how to divide the five depositions, and fails to discuss the impact of potential conflicts among the respondents; and (iv) ignores a wealth of experience about fair ways to divide limited numbers of depositions among a plaintiff and multiple defendants.  It also chooses an approach that differs greatly from what typically is adopted in the courts in similar situations, without any indication that the Commission has even considered those precedents, or why, if that consideration occurred, the judicial precedents were ignored.  The notion that in a proceeding brought by the SEC against five respondents, the SEC staff is entitled to five depositions while each respondent is entitled to only one defies logic or common sense, and the Commission attempts to provide no reasoned explanation for this arbitrary decision.

Third, even apart from the division of depositions among the parties, no rationale or reasoned explanation is given for the number of depositions permitted.  One would expect that a reasoned process would develop data about the historic need for deposition discovery in comparable cases in federal court, along with analysis of whether reductions in those numbers could be justified in the name of efficiency without sacrificing fairness.  There is no indication by the Commission that it undertook any such analysis or made any such considerations.  In fact, in factually challenging cases, it would not be unusual to have ten to thirty fact depositions in a federal court case, followed by at least two expert depositions per side.  Perhaps some of these could be avoided, but there is no analysis of either the common practice in federal court, or how that could be improved upon in the administrative court.

Out of curiosity, I did a little research to see how many depositions are permitted by the courts — usually based on a stipulation between the SEC and defendants — in SEC enforcement actions in federal court.  As noted above, this certainly is an analysis the Commission should have done before picking its own number.  My research was limited to a few of the enforcement cases reported to have been litigated by the SEC in recent years.  I did not find any case that did not permit at least 10 fact depositions for each side (expert depositions would be additional).  The number could be much larger.  In SEC v. Cuban (N.D. Tex.), each side was permitted 10 fact depositions, by mutual agreement; in SEC v. Steffes (N.D. Ill.), each side was permitted to depose “more than ten witnesses”; in SEC v. Kovzan (D. Kan.), each side was permitted 15 fact depositions; in SEC v. Anselm Exploration (D. Col.), each side was permitted 20 depositions, by mutual agreement; in SEC v. Collins & Aikman Corp. (S.D.N.Y.), the parties proposed that the SEC could notice 25 depositions and multiple defendants could notice 50, and the court allowed 15 fact depositions by the SEC and 20 fact depositions by defendants; in SEC v. Jensen (C.D. Cal.), each side was permitted 30 fact depositions, by joint agreement; in SEC v. Moshayedi (C.D. Cal., each side was allowed 25 fact depositions, by joint agreement; and in SEC v. Mudd (S.D.N.Y.), each side was permitted 75 fact depositions by joint agreement, plus as many expert depositions as there were experts designated.

Another possible approach, would be to look at the number of investigative witnesses examined by the SEC staff in these cases, plus the number of witnesses subject to informal SEC interviews, as a starting point for figuring out how many examinations the defense should be permitted.  There is no indication that the Commission did any such analysis, or even took that factor into account.

So where, exactly, is origin for the notion that five depositions (including expert depositions) is fair and sufficient?   We don’t know, because no effort is made to explain, or justify, the choice.  There is simply a number (the number 5) plucked out of the air.  Perhaps a commissioner was a fan of the famous William Carlos Williams poem “The Great Figure”:

Among the rain
and lights
I saw the figure 5
in gold
on a red
firetruck
moving
tense
unheeded
to gong clangs
siren howls
and wheels rumbling
through the dark city.

 

Or perhaps a commissioner was fond of the painting by Charles Demuth in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, “The Figure 5 in Gold,” made in homage to the Williams poem (see Where Paint and Poetry Meet).  I could understand that, because that was my favorite artwork as a kid.

Charles Demuth - The Figure 5 in Gold

Charles Demuth – The Figure 5 in Gold

Whatever may have occurred to yield the number 5, nothing we have been told suggests anything other than purely arbitrary decision-making.

Fourth, choosing a number as small as five for the number of depositions permitted (and even fewer per respondent for multiple respondents) obviously advantages the party with more access to information and witnesses outside of the deposition process, which is the SEC staff.  If a larger, and more reasonable, number were chosen, at least the defense might have an opportunity to catch up to the SEC in access to possible witnesses, learning the facts and evidence, and preparing for trial, by taking full advantage of its allocation.  But with at most five depositions permitted, this will almost never occur because most of these cases have many more potential fact witnesses (not to mention experts).

Fifth, even within the limited number of depositions, the proposed new rules also hamstring the defense of cases by limiting the witnesses the defense may subpoena.  Remember, the SEC staff has free-ranging access to witnesses during its investigation using its subpoena power, without having to sustain the burden of showing why those witnesses should be examined.  But the Commission’s proposed limit on who can be deposed places a burden and limitation on the defense, even beyond the meager numbers, because it requires that motions to quash deposition subpoenas be granted unless the party can show that the proposed deponent (i) “was a witness of or participant in any event, transaction, occurrence, act, or omission that forms the basis for any claim asserted by the Division of Enforcement, or any defense asserted by any respondent in the proceeding”; (ii) “is a designated as an ‘expert witness’” [sic]; or (iii) “has custody of documents or electronic data relevant to the claims or defenses of any party.”  The rationale given for this limitation is that: “This provision should encourage parties to focus any requested depositions on those persons who are most likely to yield relevant information and thereby make efficient use of time during the prehearing stage of the proceeding.”  But the limited number of depositions already creates ample pressure to make the best use of them, and if the defense values a deposition sufficiently to use a precious slot on a deponent even if he or she is not “a witness or participant” in the matters at issue, or a designated expert, the Commission provides no rational reason why that should not be permitted.

For example, in cases involving allegations of scienter based on a theory that the respondent’s conduct was “reckless,” the critical issue in the case may be determining the appropriate industry standard against which the judge could compare the conduct proved to determine whether it departs from that standard so egregiously that it was “reckless.”  A key witness on that issue may be one who has knowledge of the industry standard or practice — not necessarily as an expert, but as an industry participant giving fact testimony.  In fact, the fact testimony of several such witnesses could be highly relevant, until they became unduly cumulative, by which time the key factual point would be made.  Under the SEC’s limitation, such a person, who was not “a witness or participant” in an act that forms the basis for the claim, could not be deposed.  But it is hard to imagine any rational reason why that deposition testimony should be barred.  Indeed, it would seem likely that providing such evidence to the ALJ by means of a deposition transcript would be much more efficient and economic than hearing the testimony live.

Finally, there is no discussion at all about why it is appropriate to choose a single number for depositions without regard to the nature of the case, the complexity of the facts, the number of experts to be used, the length and complexity of the investigation, or any of the myriad of factors that differentiate cases from one another.  In other words, the very decision of choosing a single maximum number of permitted depositions for all cases lacks any discussion or support.  It also flies in the face of reason, reality, and years of litigation experience.  There is a reason why the number of depositions in federal court civil cases is a discovery issue to be discussed by the parties and ultimately decided by the presiding judge.  As the precedents discussed above show, cases differ, and discovery needs differ with them.  The decision to choose a single maximum number for all cases regardless of their nature and needs is by all appearances a capricious choice, even without regard to the fact that the number chosen is unconscionably low.

There no doubt are more reasons why the arbitrary choice of five depositions, to be divided among all of the respondents, lacks any reasonable basis.  But the point is sufficiently made already.  The Commission’s proposal on depositions reflects more whim than anything else.  The level of analysis of the issue and reasoned consideration of the options is pathetic.  The retention of an inherently unfair process that favors the SEC staff and undermines the defense is so clear that one can only assume it was intended.  If adopted by the Commission in a final rule, it should be challenged, and should be overturned by the court of appeals.

In Part III of our analysis of the SEC proposal, we will examine some of the other respects in which the Commission’s proposed rule changes assure that the SEC staff will continue to have a distinct advantage over respondents in the SEC’s administrative proceedings.

Straight Arrow

November 5, 2015

Contact Straight Arrow privately here, or leave a public comment below:

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2 thoughts on “Why the SEC’s Proposed Changes to Its Rules of Practice Are Woefully Inadequate — Part II

  1. Pingback: Why the SEC’s Proposed Changes to Its Rules of Practice Are Woefully Inadequate — Part III | Securities Diary

  2. Pingback: Why the SEC’s Proposed Changes to Its Rules of Practice Are Woefully Inadequate — Part IV | Securities Diary

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