Tag Archives: class action settlement

New Developments in Gordon v. Verizon Communications Class Action

There seem to be a good number of people trying to figure out what is going on in the securities class action suit in the New York State Supreme Court Gordon v. Verizon Communications, Inc., Index No. 653084/2013.  That is the case in which Judge Melvin Schweitzer famously rejected a proposed “merger tax” settlement in an opinion that received some attention.  It was a matter of some interest that a member of the New York State Bar, Gerald Walpin, filed successful papers in the case objecting to the settlement on policy grounds when the defense lawyers from the Wachtell Lipton firm stood mute in the effort to pay off the plaintiff’s counsel to allow the merger to proceed.  See Commentary on Abusive State Law Actions Following M&A Deals.

Some time ago I provided an update on developments in that case (Update on Status of Proposed Settlement in Gordon v. Verizon Communications, Inc.),  in which I noted that the plaintiff filed a notice of appeal, and that attorney Walpin sought to intervene in the case to pursue a motion for summary judgment, arguing that the defense lawyers in the case were conflicted by having agreed to the settlement.

Here is another update.  I provide this because it seems like a lot of class members are floundering around with no understanding of what is happening.

On August 3, 2015, Judge Anil Singh rejected several motions in the case, including the motion by Mr. Walpin to intervene and seeking summary judgment on behalf of the defendants, and a motion by by the plaintiff to introduce a new expert report addressing the proposed settlement and for reconsideration of Judge Schweitzer’s December 19, 2014 order denying the motion to approve that proposed settlement.  A copy of that decision is available here: Decision on motions in Gordon v. Verizon Communications.  On September 14, 2015, the plaintiff filed a Notice of Appeal of that order.  See Notice of Appeal in Gordon v. Verizon Communications.

That is pretty much all that the case docket sheet reveals.  By all outward appearances, the case is otherwise in stasis.

Since Judge Schweitzer’s decision, the “disclosure only” settlements of merger challenges — referred to by Judge Schweitzer as “merger tax” settlements — have come under attack and disrepute in a number of court decisions.  Most recently, several decisions in the Delaware Chancery Court have rejected such proposed settlements.  See Delaware Judge Tells Plaintiff Lawyers: The M&A ‘Deal Tax’ Game Is Over; Game Over?: Del. Chancery Court Rejects Disclosure-Only Settlement in H-P/Aruba Networks Merger Objection Lawsuit; and Transcript of Del. Chancery Court Hearing in Aruba Networks Stockholder Litigation, in which Vice Chancellor Laster addressed a proposed disclosure-only settlement in the H-P/Aruba merger challenge.

It seems that this sordid practice may be on the wane because judges finally are doing their jobs.  But in the meantime, the supposed beneficiaries of these cases — the shareholders — are kept totally in the dark about these developments.  Plaintiff’s counsel should be keeping these putative clients informed but, at least in this case, are obviously failing to do so, presumably because they see no vigorish in it.  What a “profession”!

Straight Arrow

October 16, 2015

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Update on Status of Proposed Settlement in Gordon v. Verizon Communications, Inc.

I’ve noticed a number of searches seeking further information on the status of the case Gordon v. Verizon Communications, Inc., Index No. 653084/2013, pending before Judge Melvin Schweitzer in the New York Supreme Court, New York County.  This is a putative class action challenging the acquisition by Verizon of Vodafone’s 45% minority stake in Verizon Wireless for $130 billion.  We previously discussed the objections lodged to a proposed settlement in that action, and Judge Schweitzer’s rejection of the settlement, in this post: Commentary on Abusive State Law Actions Following M&A Deals.  That was followed by a post on a scathing judicial statement on the impropriety of such “merger tax” cases (NY Court Flexes Muscles in Rejecting Bogus “Merger Tax” Settlement), which discussed a New York judge’s rejection of a proposed settlement in another knee-jerk merger challenge in the case City Trading Fund v. Nye, No. 651668/2014 (NY Sup. Ct.).  I recently received a note asking about where things stand in Gordon v. Verizon Communications, so here is an update.

The December 2014 opinion rejecting the settlement in Gordon (which can be found here: Decision and Order in Gordon v. Verizon Communications) was followed by the following:

  1.   One of the objectors, New York attorney Gerald Walpin, filed a motion for summary judgment on January 6, 2015, asking that the judge dismiss the plaintiff’s claim with prejudice.  The filing in support of that motion can be found here.  The plaintiff opposed that motion, in papers that can be found here.  Mr. Walpin filed this reply brief in favor of the summary judgment motion.  The briefing on that motion appears to have been completed on January 24, 2015.
  2.   The plaintiff then did two things: (i) on January 21, 2015, she filed a notice of appeal of the decision denying approval of the settlement (the notice of appeal can be found here); and (ii) on February 3, 2105, she filed a motion for reconsideration and reargument of the motion for approval of the settlement (the brief in support of the motion for reconsideration can be found here).  In other words, the plaintiff filed an appeal of the decision and then afterward asked that the same decision be reconsidered.  These are mutually inconsistent steps.  If the decision is appealed, the lower court loses jurisdiction over it and no longer can consider a reconsideration motion.  On the other hand, if a timely motion for reconsideration is filed, the earlier decision cannot properly be appealed until that motion is acted upon.  Filing the reconsideration motion after the notice of appeal might well be sanctionable.  The appeal seems flawed in any event because normally an appeal cannot occur before a case is finally decided.  Since Judge Schweitzer only denied a motion to approve the settlement, leaving the underlying case still pending in his court, there would appear to be no decision by him that is immediately appealable, absent a special order allowing an interlocutory appeal to occur.  The oppositions to the motion for reconsideration and reargument by the two objectors can be found here (opposition by Mr. Walpin), and here (opposition by objector Jonathan Crist).  Plaintiff’s reply brief in support of the motion for reargument is here.
  3.   As far as I can tell, no further action has occurred on either the motion for summary judgment or the motion for reconsideration of the denial of the settlement.  They each appear to be fully briefed.  Until some further action occurs, the proposed settlement is rejected and the case remains pending.

For those interested in the case, and in particular in the hearing held by Judge Schweitzer to consider the proposed settlement, a copy of the transcript of that hearing is available here:  Transcript of December 2, 2014 Hearing in Gordon v. Verizon Communications, Inc. on the motion for approval of proposed settlement.

Straight Arrow

March 2, 2015

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