Tag Archives: James Grimes

SEC Hit with Double Whammy Rulings Barring It from Commencing Challenged Administrative Proceedings

On the afternoon of September 17, 2015, the SEC was rebuffed by two federal courts in separate cases challenging the constitutionality of the SEC’s administrative law enforcement proceedings.  As reported here, the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit granted Lynn Tilton an order barring the SEC from proceeding with an administrative trial on charges against her, pending that court’s resolution of a dispute over whether the federal courts have jurisdiction to consider her complaint that the administrative proceeding would violate Article II of the Constitution.  At roughly the same time, New York federal district court Judge Richard Berman rejected a motion by the SEC to allow it to proceed with an administrative action against Barbara Duka while it appealed (to the Second Circuit) Judge Berman’s preliminary injunction barring that proceeding from moving forward, on the very same constitutional grounds.  Judge Berman’s preliminary injunction order can be read here: Order Issuing Preliminary Injunction in Duka v. SEC; and his order denying the SEC’s stay motion can be read here: Decision and Order in Duka v. SEC.

The result is that two more administrative proceedings are now barred by court orders, joining two others that were barred by orders of Judge Leigh May in the federal district court in Atlanta.  See Court Issues Preliminary Injunction Halting Likely Unconstitutional SEC Proceeding, and Order Enjoining SEC in Gray Financial Group v. SEC.

The Second Circuit order was brief and straightforward.  But Judge Berman’s denial of the SEC’s application for a stay is filled with meaty discussions of key issues, including reiterating that several of the SEC’s positions on jurisdiction and the merits are wrong, suggesting that the SEC plays a little fast and loose with the positions it argues, and emphasizing that the SEC might want to be more proactive in addressing allegations of potential bias in its administrative court.

Judge Richard Berman - NYLJ/Rick Kopstein 100614

Judge Richard Berman – NYLJ/Rick Kopstein

On the jurisdictional issue, Judge Berman restated his belief that his court does have jurisdiction over the Duka constitutional challenge (“The Court is, respectfully, convinced that it made the correct finding of subject matter jurisdiction,” slip op. at 3), and took the time to address the contrary position recently reached by the Seventh Circuit in Bebo v. SEC, 2015 WL 4998489 (7th Cir. Aug. 24, 2015) (see 7th Circuit Rules for SEC, Affirming Dismissal of Bebo Case on Jurisdictional Grounds).  He openly disagreed with the Seventh Circuit’s view that the Supreme Court decision in Elgin v. Dep’t. of the Treasury, 132 S. Ct. 2126 (2012), was on point because the factual circumstances differed significantly.  See slip op. at 8-9.

Judge Berman also made pointed statements elsewhere in his opinion arguing that immediate consideration of the consitutional issue was consistent with Second Circuit law and the public interest.  For example: “The SEC argues unconvincingly that a party in Ms. Duka’s shoes ‘must patiently await the denouement of proceedings within the [administrative agency],” . . . .  But Second Circuit precedent appears to refute such a notion.  See Touche Ross & Co. v. S.E.C., 609 F.2d 570, 577 (2d Cir. 1979) (‘[T]o require appellants to exhaust their administrative remedies would be to require them to submit to the very procedures which they are attacking.’).”  Slip op. at 15-16 (some cites omitted).  And: “With respect to the public interest, the Court submits that it is of the utmost importance to the public that complex constitutional questions be resolved at the outset, with finality, and by application of the expertise of the federal courts.  See, e.g., Massaro v. United States, 538 U.S. 500,504 (2003); see also Pappas v. Giuliani, 118 F. Supp. 2d 433, 442 (S.D.N.Y. 2000) affd, 290 F.3d 143 (2d Cir. 2002) (‘Although often highly competent in their designated area of law, administrative decision-makers generally have neither the training nor the experience to adjudicate complex federal constitutional issues.’); Austin v. Ford, 181 F.R.D. 283, 286 (S.D.N.Y. 1998) (‘Public interest in finality of judgment encompasses the development of decisional law, the importance of the opinion to nonparties, and the deterrence of frivolous litigation.’).”  Slip op. at 16 (some cites and footnote omitted).

All of these points could be impactful as the Second Circuit considers the same jurisdictional issue in the Tilton v. SEC appeal.

On the merits, Judge Berman restated his belief that Supreme Court case law leaves little doubt that the SEC’s administrative law judges are “inferior officers” within the meaning of that term in Article II, and, as a result, their appointments are subject to limitations in Article II’s Appointments Clause.  His finding that the High Court reasoning and holding in Freytag v. Commissioner, 501 U.S. 868 (1991), yields the conclusion that SEC ALJs are inferior officers because they exercised “significant authority pursuant to the laws of the United States” was not new – as he noted, he previously reached the same conclusion when he issued the preliminary injunction.  Slip op. at 9.  But it came within two weeks of the SEC reaching the opposite conclusion in its recent decision on the petition for review in In the Matter of Raymond J. Lucia Cos., Inc., File No. 15006 (see SEC Declares All Is Okay Because Its ALJs Are Just Employees and Not “Inferior Officers”), without even mentioning that decision or its analysis, suggesting Judge Berman found the SEC reasoning unpersuasive and sees no reason to defer to SEC views on the issue.  No doubt with knowledge of the specific analysis of the SEC in Lucia, he still wrote: “the SEC will not, in the Court’s view, be able to persuade the appellate courts that ALJs are not “inferior officers.”  Slip op. at 11.  Judge Berman’s bottom line: “Duka’s constitutional (Appointments Clause) challenge is (very) likely to succeed.”  Id. at 10.

On the SEC’s nimble willingness to revise its arguments to fit the circumstances, Judge Berman noted the “irony” of the SEC’s new-found emphasis on the compelling importance of judicial efficiency after it scoffed at Ms. Duka’s similar arguments in the original preliminary injunction hearing.  He wrote: “The Court’s reference to ‘irony’ [in an earlier ruling] refers to the fact that conservation of Duka’s resources was a core argument that she raised in objecting to participating in the SEC’s administrative proceedings prior to resolution of her constitutional challenge in federal court.  The SEC flatly opposed that argument, which it now appears firmly to embrace.”  He quoted his own statement during the oral argument that “I don’t understand why you reject that argument when Ms. Duka makes it but then at the same time in this Court you make the very same argument.”  Slip op. at 3 n.2.

And Judge Berman was surely making a point when he dwelled, without any apparent need, on the SEC’s opaque handling of publicly-disclosed evidence that its own administrative court could have a latent, or even intentional, bias in favor of the prosecution.  His opinion includes the following striking paragraph:

The Court is aware of recent allegations of undue pressure said to have been applied to an SEC ALJ to cause her to make SEC-favorable rulings.  “Lillian McEwen, who was an SEC judge from 1995 to 2007, said she came under fire from [Chief Administrative Law Judge Brenda] Murray for finding too often in favor of defendants.”  See Jean Eaglesham, SEC Wins with In-House Judges, The Wall Street Journal, May 6, 2015. . . .  And, in In the Matter of Timbervest, respondents allegedly sought to depose presiding ALJ Cameron Elliot, who was then allegedly invited by the SEC “to file by July I, 2015 an affidavit addressing whether he has had any communications or experienced any pressure similar to that alleged in the May 6, 2015 The Wall Street Journal article.”. . .  On June 9, 2015, ALJ Elliot emailed the following response: “I respectfully decline to submit the affidavit requested.”  See Jean Eagelsham, SEC Judge Declines to Submit Affidavit of No Bias, The Wall Street Journal, June 11, 2015. . . .  On July 24,2015, Chief Administrative Law Judge Murray issued an Order Redesignating Presiding Judge, designating Administrative Law Judge James E. Grimes “in place and stead of the Administrative Law Judge [ALJ Cameron Elliot] heretofore designated, to preside at the hearing in these proceedings and to perform other and related duties in accordance with the Commissioner’s Rules of Practice.”  See In the Matter of Barbara Duka, File No. 3-16349 (SEC).

During the September 16, 2015 hearing, the Court noted that it was “aware that there is some sort of flap at the SEC with respect to some of the ALJs,” that it “want[ed] to get further clarification about that matter,” and that “in this very case, [ALJ] Cameron Elliot . . . has been reassigned because he was not able or would not submit an affidavit.”. . .  While acknowledging that ALJ Elliot was removed from the Duka matter, Ms. Lin contended that “Judge Elliot has a very busy docket . . . and there is no suggestion, no connection whatsoever about [The Wall Street Journal article], about that particular former ALJ’s accusations to Judge Elliot’s reassignment in this case. . . .  And it’s not true that there would be any kind of connection.”. . .  The Court assumes that the SEC will want fully to investigate these matters.

Slip op. at 14-15 (citations omitted and emphasis added).

Apparently Judge Berman is as perplexed as yours truly when the Commission seems more insouciant than concerned in its reaction to serious public questioning of the fairness of its own administrative judicial process.  See SEC Bumbles Efforts To Figure Out How Its Own Administrative Law Judges Were Appointed; and SEC “Invites” ALJ Cameron Elliot To Provide Affidavit on Conversations “Similar” to Those Described by Former ALJ.  Indeed — although Judge Berman made no mention of this — it is downright embarrassing that 15 months ago the SEC’s General Counsel acknowledged that the Rules of Practice governing SEC administrative proceeding are archaic and need revamping and nothing has yet been done to address that issue.  See SEC Administrative Case Rules Likely Out Of Date, GC Says.  (Ms. Small said it was fair for attorneys to question whether the SEC’s rules for administrative proceedings were still appropriate, with the rules last revised “quite some time ago” when the SEC’s administrative proceedings dealt with different kinds of cases than the more complex administrative matters it now takes on or expects to take on — given the commission’s expanded authority under the Dodd-Frank Act — such as insider-trading actions.  It was “entirely reasonable to wonder” if those rules should be updated to reflect the changed situation, for instance by allowing more flexibility on current limits to trial preparation time or allowing for depositions to be taken.  “We want to make sure the process is fair and reasonable, so [changing] procedures to reflect the changes makes a lot of sense.”)

Anne Small -- SEC General Counsel

Anne Small — SEC General Counsel

When all of the dust settles on the Appointments Clause and other Article II constitutional challenges to these administrative courts, we will still be left with what every practicing securities litigator knows are vastly diminished due process rights in the SEC’s administrative courts as compared to the federal courts.  Judge Berman certainly seemed concerned about this in his opinion.  He said: “during the September 16, 2015 hearing, the SEC argued that administrative proceedings would serve the public interest because ‘it is a much faster process and it expedites the consideration and the determination of whether the underlying security violations had actually occurred and, more importantly, to impose the kind of remedy that would then help to prevent future harm.’. . .  The Court responded that ‘faster is [not] necessarily better because faster means no juries, no discovery, no declaratory relief.  In federal court you can get that . . . there’s a whole lot of protections, Ms. Duka argues, that are available in federal courts that are not available before the Commission.'”  Slip op. at 16.

If the SEC continues to be empowered to exercise effectively uncontrolled discretion over which cases are directed to the administrative courts (as a result of the expanded jurisdiction of those courts under the Dodd-Frank Act), and it continues to ignore obvious needs to modernize and balance the procedures for those proceedings to eliminate their “Star Chamber” similarities, the controversy over these actions will be unabated.

Straight Arrow

September 18, 2015

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SEC Gambit To Avoid Judge May in Timbervest Case Seems To Have Failed

We previously wrote about the SEC’s desperate effort to avoid the assignment of Timbervest, LLC v. SEC, Civil Action No. 1:15-CV-2106 (N.D. Ga.), to District Judge Leigh Martin May.  See SEC, Desperate To Avoid Judge May, Challenges Related Case Designation in Timbervest Action and SEC Argues Common “Facts” Are Not Common “Issues of Fact” — I Kid You Not.  You recall that Judge May ruled in Hill v. SEC that the appointment of SEC ALJ James Grimes violated the appointments clause of Article II of the Constitution — see Court Issues Preliminary Injunction Halting Likely Unconstitutional SEC Proceeding.

Well, it appears that the SEC’s motion challenging the “related case” assignment of the Timbervest action to Judge May failed.  There is no order in the docket denying the motion, but a recent scheduling order issued by Judge May suggests she will continue to preside over the case.  See Timbervest v. SEC Scheduling Order.  In the Order, Judge May states that the SEC must respond to plaintiffs’ Motion for a Temporary Restraining Order and/or Preliminary Injunction by June 29, plaintiffs must file a reply brief by July 16, and “the parties will attend a hearing in this matter a hearing” on July 21, in Courtroom 2107.  Courtroom 2107 is listed in the N.D. Georgia directory as Judge May’s courtroom.

In the meantime, in the SEC administrative case brought against Gray Financial Group, In the Matter of Gray Financial Group, Inc. et al., File No. 3-16554, SEC ALJ Cameron Elliot declined to issue a stay of proceedings in response to an unopposed motion founded on the pending federal action for injunctive relief by Gray Financial in the same Georgia federal court, which was also assigned to Judge May.  He said: “Commission Rule of Practice 161 instructs that I ‘should adhere to a policy of strongly disfavoring’ stay requests unless ‘the requesting party makes a strong showing that the denial of the request or motion would substantially prejudice their case.’  17 C.F.R. § 201.161(b)(1).  Respondents have not made such a showing.  I will abide by an injunction if it is issued; however, as of now I have been instructed to resolve this proceeding within 300 days of service of the OIP.”  See Order Denying Unopposed Motion To Stay Administrative Proceeding Against Gray Financial Group.

So, chaos still reigns, and apparently the SEC is unsure about how best to bring it under control.  See SEC Rejects Easy Answers To Admin Court Challenges.  In that article, Law 360’s Stephanie Russell-Kraft reported on a discussion between Judge Richard Berman and a DOJ lawyer representing the SEC.  Judge Berman asked whether, in light of comments by Judge May that it might be easy to cure the appointments clause violation, the similar claims brought before him by Barbara Duka (in Duka v. SEC) could be resolved simply by having the Commission reappoint its current ALJs.  The DOJ lawyer declined to address whether that could be done, leading to the following colloquy:

“Is the commission opposed to an easy fix?” Judge Berman asked.

“The Department of Justice is very actively considering the best litigation approach to address this issue,” Lin answered.

“I’m asking you if [appointing the judges] would solve this issue,” Judge Berman pressed, pointing out that the case pending before him had nothing to do with the SEC’s litigation strategy.

“It’s not like if we pursue one of these options this case or other cases will go away,” Lin answered, adding that changing the way it appoints its judges is not a “meaningful way” to address Judge May’s decisions or a “practical way” for it to approach its long-standing administrative court scheme.

“The commission has to consider all the cases it has,” she said later, to which Judge Berman replied, “I don’t.”

Meanwhile, the SEC’s administrative proceeding against Laurie Bebo continues to be tried, even while the appeal of Ms. Bebo’s injunctive action moves forward in the Seventh Circuit.

The ship is plainly adrift.

Straight Arrow

June 23, 2015

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SEC, Desperate To Avoid Judge May, Challenges Related Case Designation in Timbervest Action

The SEC really wants to avoid Judge Leigh Martin May — the Northern District of Georgia judge who ruled in Hill v. SEC that the appointment of SEC ALJ James Grimes violated the appointments clause of Article II of the Constitution — like the plague.  The Commission filed a motion in Timbervest, LLC v. SEC seeking nullification of the assignment of the Timbervest action to Judge May as a case related to Hill v. SEC because it does not properly fit the definition of a “related case.”  The Timbervest complaint was filed after another case in that district making the same constitutional argument, Gray Financial Group v. SEC, was reassigned to Judge May as a related case.  See Timbervest Files Complaint and TRO Motion To Halt SEC Proceeding.  Timbervest identified it as a case related to Hill and Gray Financial in the cover sheet for its complaint, and the Timbervest action was assigned to Judge May, but the SEC’s papers do not address the actual process and rationale leading to the assignment of the case to Judge May.  Instead, the SEC accused Timbervest of “judge shopping” by checking the “related case” box.  By all appearances, however, it is the SEC that is “judge shopping” with this motion — shopping for any N.D. Ga. judge other than Judge Leigh Martin May.

The SEC’s motion can be read here: SEC motion opposing related case designation in Timbervest case.  Plaintiff’s response can be read here: Plaintiff’s response to SEC reassignment motion in Timbervest.

The SEC’s argument is that cases are “related” for purposes of judicial assignment in the Northern District of Georgia only if they arise out of common facts (“Plaintiffs noted the supposed relationship between their case, on the one hand, and Hill and Gray on the other, by checking a box on their civil cover sheet allowing for the designation of cases as related if they ‘involve the same issue of fact or arise[] out of the same event or transaction included in an earlier numbered pending suit.’”)  But, the SEC argues, the court’s Internal Operating Procedures establish that “a case is NOT related if it has the same LEGAL issue. . . .”  (quoting Rule 905-2(a)).  The SEC contends that Hill, Gray Financial, and Timbervest all present a common legal issue about the validity of the appointment of ALJs, but they arise out of very different facts (i.e., the SEC’s factual contentions of law violations are different in each case): “the cases do not arise out of the same event or transaction. To the contrary, the cases arise out of different administrative proceedings involving different respondents.”

This argument conflates the facts relevant to the SEC’s charges in the administrative cases with those relevant to the plaintiffs’ complaints pending before the district court.  Each of these cases — that is, each of the federal court complaints — turn on essentially identical facts about the appointments of, powers granted to, and removal limitations for, the ALJs presiding over the proceedings.  The critical facts at issue are not the underlying violations of law charged by the SEC, but the nearly identical facts surrounding the appointment of the ALJs assigned to hear the three administrative cases, the President’s control (or lack thereof) over those ALJs, and the powers they exercise as ALJs.

In fact, the SEC itself previously argued to Judge May that the only relevant facts in the Hill case are the circumstances of the appointment of ALJ James Grimes (see SEC Says It Will Appeal Hill v. SEC Decision, Seek To Stay the Case, and Try To Prevent Discovery).  Since the Timbervest complaint alleges that the same circumstances apply to the appointment of ALJ Cameron Elliot, who presided over the Timbervest administrative trial, the SEC should be in agreement that the material issues in each of those cases “involve the same issue of fact.” 

But putting aside the merits of the SEC’s argument, it is difficult to understand why the SEC cares about whether the Timbervest case is assigned to the same or a different judge than the Hill and Gray Financial cases.  The SEC already informed Judge May that it will be appealing her preliminary injunction order to the 11th Circuit.  See SEC Says It Will Appeal Hill v. SEC Decision, Seek To Stay the Case, and Try To Prevent Discovery.  Given the fact that this issue is going up on appeal no matter what, why make a desperate motion to reassign a case turning on what is acknowledged to be an identical legal issue to another judge in the same district?  The legal issue is going to be heard de novo by the court of appeals; there is little or no value in trying to force another judge to labor on another opinion.  And even if the case were reassigned, the strong likelihood is that a different judge in the same district would defer to Judge May’s opinion — which, whether ultimately right or wrong, is thoughtful and certainly not off the wall — rather than labor through the complex analysis again, knowing that the 11th Circuit will be ruling soon in any event.

So, even putting aside the questionable legal arguments made by the Commission, the problem with this motion to reassign the Timbervest case is that it just doesn’t make a lot of tactical, strategic, or common sense.  The filing of the motion, together with a bevy of other questionable recent decisions made by the Commission on the issues raised over the last year about the SEC’s administrative enforcement practices, leaves the impression that very little thought is being given to an overall plan for dealing with what is plainly an important problem.  (Three examples come immediately to mind: the publication without hearings or comment of slapdash and plainly meaningless guidelines for bringing cases administratively, which have been roundly ridiculed by commentators; the recent debacle where the Commission asked ALJ Elliot for an affidavit on bias issues and Mr. Elliot declined to do so; and the Commission’s apparent paralysis in responding to remarks by former ALJ Lillian McEwen about possible systemic biases in the administrative court.)  See Upon Further Review, SEC Memo on Use of Administrative Courts Was Indeed a Fumble; SEC ALJ Cameron Elliot Declines To Submit Affidavit “Invited” by the Commission; and Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal.

Most everything the SEC is doing now with these cases, and on the critical issues raised by the Commission’s increased use of administrative enforcement actions, seems without rhyme or reason.  The Commission and its staff need to sit back, take a deep breath, and figure out how to get to a resolution of these serious concerns with minimal chaos and upheaval, both in the courts and in its own administrative court.  Right now, that is just not happening, and the resulting turmoil is saddening and a bit frightening.

Straight Arrow

June 17, 2015

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Timbervest Files Complaint and TRO Motion To Halt SEC Proceeding

Today (June 12, 2015), Timbervest, LLC filed a complaint in federal court in the Northern District of Georgia seeking a halt to its ongoing SEC administrative proceeding, In the Matter of Timbervest, LLC at al.  We have previously discussed the Timbervest SEC proceeding, including recent developments involving Timbervest’s challenge to the constitutionality of the SEC administrative process and requests for discovery into possible systemic bias within the administrative court.  See Briefing of ALJ Constitutionality Before SEC Leaves Resolution in Doubt, SEC Broadens Constitutional Inquiry into Its Own Administrative Judges in Timbervest Case, SEC “Invites” ALJ Cameron Elliot To Provide Affidavit on Conversations “Similar” to Those Described by Former ALJ, and SEC ALJ Cameron Elliot Declines To Submit Affidavit “Invited” by the Commission.

With its efforts to pursue the constitutional challenge before the SEC meeting obstacles before the Commission, Timbervest opted to seek federal court intervention, commencing an action for injunctive relief, and moving for a temporary restraining order.  Those documents can be found here: Complaint in Timbervest v. SECMemorandum in Support of Motion for TRO in Timbervest v. SEC.

Because Timbervest is located in Atlanta, it filed its complaint in the federal district court for the Northern District of Georgia.  That is the same court that days ago halted a different SEC administrative proceeding, In the Matter of Charles L. Hill, Jr., in the action Hill v. SEC.  In that case, Judge Leigh Martin May found the appointment of ALJ James Grimes violated the appointments clause of Article II of the Constitution.  See Court Issues Preliminary Injunction Halting Likely Unconstitutional SEC Proceeding. And another case filed in that same court by yet another SEC respondent, Gray Financial Group v. SEC, was just assigned to Judge May as a related case.  See Ga. Judge Who Blocked SEC Admin Suit Gets Similar Case.  The new Timbervest complaint, which is case number 1:15-cv-02106-LMM, was also assigned to Judge May.

Judge May. an Obama appointee who is only in her first year of service as a judge, was active in the Democratic party before her appointment.  An article discussing her background can be read here: The Atlanta Judge Who Stuck A Thorn In The SEC’s Side.

In the Timbervest SEC proceeding, ALJ Cameron Elliot issued an Initial Decision as to which both the respondents and the SEC staff petitioned for Commission review, which was granted.  After briefing of the issues before the Commission, and supplemental briefing addressing constitutional issues, Timbervest sought discovery after the Wall Street Journal revealed possible pressures on SEC administrative judges to favor the SEC staff.  See Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal.  Only days ago, the Commission held oral argument on the petitions for review.  But after Judge May”s decision in the Hill case, and ALJ Elliot’s refusal to provide information about possible pressures requested by the Commissioners, Timbervest felt it had to seek relief in federal court, saying: “Plaintiffs have appealed the ALJ’s Initial Decision to the Commission, but it has become clear that the Commission should not hear these arguments.  First, the Commission itself did not properly appoint the ALJ.  Second, the Commission has argued in other cases that its administrative forum is constitutional.  Thus, Plaintiffs’ appeal to the Commission is nothing more than an exercise in futility.”  Complaint ¶ 8.

The Timbervest complaint reveals an interesting issue about the handling of its case by the SEC’s ALJs.  The case was originally assigned to Chief Administrative Law Judge Brenda Murray, but then handed over to ALJ Elliot.  (ALJ Murray is the person identified by former ALJ Lillian McEwen as having told Ms. McEwen that she “questioned her loyalty to the SEC” because she did not treat the SEC staff sufficiently favorably.)  ALJs Murray and Elliot allegedly made a critical decision preventing Timbervest from using Brady material (material tending to show the respondents were innocent):

Given the age of the case, the primary evidence presented in support of the Division’s alleged violations was the faded and inconsistent memories of two Division witnesses.  As to one of those witnesses, Plaintiffs argued that the SEC had in its possession Brady material that the Commission’s staff disagreed with and argued was inadvertently produced.  The Brady material consisted of notes of two interviews the Commission’s staff conducted with that witness.  The Plaintiffs argued that the notes were exculpatory and, at the very least, were inconsistent statements that were required to be produced.  Pursuant to the SEC’s own administrative proceeding rules, it is required to produce Brady material.  Even though the SEC conducted an investigation that lasted over three years,speaking to numerous individuals over that time, the Commission’s staff did not produce any documents or information that it identified as Brady to the Plaintiffs.  Ultimately, ALJ Elliot, as well as ALJ Murray, ruled in favor of the Commission’s staff that the notes were not Brady, even though the notes were clearly inconsistent and exculpatory.

Complaint ¶ 28.

The Timbervest complaint also revealed that the SEC staff acknowledged that “ALJ Elliot was not hired through a process involving the approval of the individual members of the Commission.”  The staff could not state how ALJ Murray was appointed because “Chief ALJ Murray began work at the agency in 1988 and information regarding hiring practices at that time is not readily available.”  Complaint ¶ 36.  At a minimum, then, if Judge May retains her view that the SEC’s administrative law judges are “inferior officers” of the Executive Branch, a finding that ALJ Elliot was improperly appointed may come soon.  The only thing that might prevent such a ruling is if Judge May concludes that because the Timbervest SEC proceeding has already gone through trial and is before the SEC on review of the Initial Decision — a different set of circumstances than she faced in the Hill case — a federal court should not take jurisdiction over the case.

The SEC’s pot is now boiling over in, of all places, Atlanta, Georgia.

Straight Arrow

June 12, 2105

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SEC ALJ James Grimes Denies Request To Certify Discovery Ruling for Interlocutory Appeal

We reported several days ago that SEC administrative law judge James Grimes approved a subpoena to the SEC for materials relating to the allegations by former SEC ALJ Lillian McEwen that she was pressured as an ALJ to issue favorable rulings for the SEC staff.  See SEC ALJ James Grimes Issues Important Discovery Order Against SEC.  The SEC’s Office of General Counsel (OGC) was not pleased.  It asked ALJ Grimes to certify an interlocutory appeal to the Commission itself to challenge the discovery order.  On June 1, 2015, ALJ Grimes rejected that request for an interlocutory appeal.  His order can be read here: Order Denying Certification.

The OGC argued “that Mr. Hill’s request is “extraordinary,” and contrary to “the presumption that administrative law judges are unbiased.”  But the OGC did “not assert that Mr. Hill seeks irrelevant information.”  ALJ Grimes noted that “Mr. Hill has a due process right to an unbiased adjudicator and the media article to which he refers raises concerns about that right,” even though “the Office of the General Counsel is correct that administrative law judges are presumed to be unbiased.”  He also observed that “the conversation that is alleged in the media article must have occurred at least ten years ago — if it ever occurred at all,” and “Mr. Hill has done little to tie that alleged conversation to his proceeding.”  That’s not totally correct, since the person who allegedly pressured Ms. McEwen, Brenda Murray, is currently the Chief ALJ for the SEC — what additional connection could Mr. Hill supply without any discovery?

In any event, ALJ Grimes rejected the request because “[t]he initial opposition to Mr. Hill’s request, however, was based only on an argument that the request sought irrelevant information. The opposition made no mention of the arguments the Office of the General Counsel now raises. The Commission, however, has made clear that a litigant ‘may not rely upon . . . arguments’ not previously raised ‘as a basis for urging interlocutory review.’”  Because “the current basis for seeking interlocutory review was not previously raised, the request for certification is denied.”

ALJ Grimes did stay the obligation to comply with the subpoena until June 4, 2105, to allow the OGC “time to determine whether to seek interlocutory review absent certification.”

Straight Arrow

June 2, 2015

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SEC Broadens Constitutional Inquiry into Its Own Administrative Judges in Timbervest Case

On May 27, 2015, the SEC agreed to expand its own consideration of constitutionality challenges to its administrative law adjudicative process.  It issued an order asking for further briefing on whether the appointment of its administrative law judges conforms to the Constitution’s Appointments Clause.  The order, which was issued in the administrative proceeding In the Matter of Timbervest LLC et al., File No. 3-15519, is laid out below.  We previously discussed the briefing of constitutional issues before the SEC in the Timbervest case here: Briefing of ALJ Constitutionality Before SEC Leaves Resolution in Doubt.

This new development was set in motion by the May 7, 2015 Wall Street Journal article by Jean Eaglesham reporting on questions being raised about the fairness and constitutionality of the SEC’s use of its own administrative courts to prosecute securities enforcement actions for severe penalties, especially against people who were not otherwise subject to SEC regulatory oversight.  See Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal.  Among other things, that article quoted a former SEC administrative law judge about pressure that had been placed on her to favor the SEC in her rulings.  That revelation spurred respondents in SEC actions to seek further information from the SEC about possible bias or other taints to the SEC’s administrative law proceedings.  In the proceeding In the Matter of Charles L. Hill, Jr., administrative law judge James Grimes approved a subpoena to the SEC staff for the production of documents relating to the matters discussed in the Wall Street Journal article.  See SEC ALJ James Grimes Issues Important Discovery Order Against SEC.  The respondents in the Timbervest proceeding, which is now under review by the Commission itself after an Initial Decision against the respondents by ALJ Cameron Elliot, also asked for discovery into the matters raised in the WSJ article in a filing that can be read here: Respondents’ Motion To Allow Submission of Additional Evidence and Motion for Leave To Adduce Additional Evidence.  That led to the May 27 SEC order:

On May 20, 2015, Respondents filed a Motion to Allow Submission of Additional Evidence and for Leave to Adduce Additional Evidence.  Based on that motion, the Respondents now appear to be asserting that the manner of appointment of the administrative law judges who presided over this matter violates the Appointments Clause of the Constitution.

The Commission’s consideration of the Appointments Clause challenge would be assisted by the submission of additional material for inclusion in the record and by the submission of additional briefing.

Accordingly, it is ORDERED that the Division of Enforcement shall by June 4, 2015 file and serve on the parties an affidavit from an appropriate Commission staff member, with supporting exhibits if appropriate, setting forth the manner in which ALJ Cameron Elliot and Chief ALJ Brenda Murray were hired, including the method of selection and appointment.

It is further ORDERED that the parties shall file simultaneous supplemental briefs . . . limited to the following two issues: (1) whether, assuming solely for the sake of argument that the Commission’s ALJs are “inferior officers” within the meaning of Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 of the Constitution, their manner of appointment violates the Appointments Clause; and (2) the appropriate remedy if such a violation is found.

In a footnote, the Commission said it was not yet deciding the Timbervest motion, including “the materiality of the discovery sought.”  The order in its entirety can be found here: Order Requesting Additional Submissions and Additional Briefing.

The SEC is treading carefully here.  We know, of course, that there is no chance the Commission will rule that its own administrative proceedings are unconstitutional in any respect, but Mary Jo White is a good enough lawyer to know she has to make a record that will not undercut the appearance of fairness in this entire process, or suggest any SEC bias in its own favor.  Just saying that shows how absurd the process is: the SEC is obviously conflicted in considering whether the prosecutions it sent to its administrative judges are unconstitutional.  That, among other reasons, is why this issue needs to be thrashed out fully before actual Article III judges in Article III courts.  Nevertheless, federal district court judges, with one exception, have ruled they lack the jurisdiction to consider the issue.  See Court Dismisses “Compelling and Meritorious” Bebo Constitutional Claims Solely on Jurisdictional Grounds; SEC Wins First Skirmish on Constitutional Challenge to Chau Administrative Proceeding.  The one exception led to a decision in the SEC’s favor that lacked the substance to serve as a compelling precedent: see In Duka v. SEC, SDNY Judge Berman Finds SEC Administrative Law Enforcement Proceedings Constitutional in a Less than Compelling Opinion.

The revelation of possible pressure on SEC ALJs to favor the SEC would be a game-changer if it is substantiated.  That introduces new elements of due process and fundamental fairness concerns beyond the separation of powers and appointments clause issues that have been the focus of most of the challenges to date.  How the Commission could question the “materiality” of that information is hard to fathom.  As we previously wrote, the only appropriate response to such a “red flag” is to commence a fully independent review of issue.  That is, of course, what the SEC would demand if a similar event were to occur in a public company, in order to avoid a later charge by the SEC and its staff of “reckless disregard” of “red flags.”  But apparently different rules govern the Commission, which seems to be placing itself above the law.

Straight Arrow

May 28, 2015

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SEC ALJ James Grimes Issues Important Discovery Order Against SEC

In In the Matter of Charles L. Hill, Jr., File No. 3-16383, SEC Administrative Law Judge James E. Grimes issued a subpoena requested by Mr. Hill requiring that the SEC produce materials relevant to Mr. Hill’s objections to using the SEC administrative law forum to pursue the enforcement action against him.  The Division of Enforcement and SEC Office of General Counsel (OGC) objected to the motion seeking the subpoena on what were plainly frivolous grounds.  ALJ Grimes properly rejected those objections and compelled the SEC to provide potentially important materials bearing on the fairness or constitutionality of the SEC’s administrative enforcement process.  See the order here: In re Hill Order Partially Granting Subpoena Request.

Recall that ALJ Grimes previously concluded that he lacked jurisdiction to consider some aspects of Mr. Hill’s constitutional challenge to the proceeding (see SEC ALJ Says He Lacks Authority To Decide Key Constitutional Challenges).  Following the issuance of that order, Mr. Hill commenced an action in federal court in the Northern District of Georgia to seek consideration of the constitutional issues the ALJ said he could not consider.  See Complaint in Hill v. SEC (N.D. Ga.).

The subpoena requested by Mr. Hill and opposed by the SEC covered a number of areas, but only two were addressed in yesterday’s order: (1) seeking documents identifying all SEC enforcement actions brought administratively against persons not subject to SEC regulatory oversight solely for alleged violations of section 14(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and (2) seeking documents “that support, or reflect or are related to the allegations made by Lillian McEwen, a former SEC administrative law judge, as reported by the Wall Street Journal on May 6, 2015, that chief administrative law judge Brenda Murray ‘questioned [her] loyalty to the SEC’ as a result of finding too often in favor of defendants and that SEC administrative law judges are expected to work on the assumption that ‘the burden was on the people who were accused to show that they didn’t do what the agency said they did.'”  This second request relates to last week’s blockbuster Wall Street Journal article about the SEC’s possible unfair use of its administrative process to prosecute enforcement actions.  See Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal.

The objections raised to those aspects of the subpoena request were patently insufficient.  On the first request, the OGC argued the documents sought were “covered by attorney-client privilege and the work-product doctrine.”  Since the request on its face asked only for documents reflecting or reporting on public information (the actual filing of a proceeding), this objection was nonsensical (sanctionable, if the SEC can be sanctioned by its own ALJ).  ALJ Grimes appropriately gave the objection short shrift: “The identity of administrative proceedings is a matter of public record.  As such, documents that identify administrative cases . . . are not protected by the privileges asserted.”

On the second request, the OGC argued “‘[i]t is difficult to perceive how’ the requested documents could be relevant.”  Perhaps so if you are still in elementary school; but if you are a practicing lawyer, the relevance is obvious, since the information requested goes directly to a potential systemic bias imbued in SEC ALJs that would flout due process.  In response to the SEC’s perception problems, ALJ Grimes said no more than “I disagree,” and ordered production of any responsive materials.

The SEC OGC and Enforcement Division do themselves and the Commission no favors by making knee-jerk oppositions to discovery requests by respondents in administrative proceedings.  The very fact that the subpoenas must be approved by the ALJ before being served is a significant disadvantage for respondents as compared to federal court defendants (who can issue subpoenas to third parties, or make document requests of parties, without court approval).  It makes it worse that the SEC will routinely object to any attempt of a respondent to gather evidence through issuance of a subpoena.  It is obviously beyond the pale to do so on purely frivolous grounds.

Kudos to ALJ Grimes for his quick rejection of the SEC staff’s obstructive efforts.  The materials sought could have an important bearing on consideration of constitutional issues raised by Mr. Hill.  And, after the statements made by a former SEC ALJ, development of the record of possible misconduct relating to attempts to influence SEC ALJs to favor the SEC staff in administrative proceedings is essential.  Frankly, it is sad (but, unfortunately, not surprising) that in light of the charge made, the Commission itself has not already commenced an inquiry to assure that its own administrative proceedings have not been tainted by such bias.

Straight Arrow

May 22, 2015

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