Tag Archives: Jean Eaglesham

SEC Proposes Amended Rules of Practice in Recognition of Unfair Procedures

Today, September 24, 2015, the SEC issued proposed amendments to the Rules of Practice governing SEC administrative proceedings.  You can read them here.

This comes 15 months after the SEC’s General Counsel Anne Small noted that the existing rules were archaic, and insufficient to handle the complex cases being sent to the SEC’s administrative courts.  See SEC Administrative Case Rules Likely Out Of Date, GC Says.  (Ms. Small said it was fair for attorneys to question whether the SEC’s rules for administrative proceedings were still appropriate, with the rules last revised “quite some time ago” when the SEC’s administrative proceedings dealt with different kinds of cases than the more complex administrative matters it now takes on or expects to take on — given the commission’s expanded authority under the Dodd-Frank Act — such as insider-trading actions.  It was “entirely reasonable to wonder” if those rules should be updated to reflect the changed situation, for instance by allowing more flexibility on current limits to trial preparation time or allowing for depositions to be taken.  “We want to make sure the process is fair and reasonable, so [changing] procedures to reflect the changes makes a lot of sense.”)

Since then, the challenges to SEC administrative proceedings have been fast and furious.  Some arguments that alleged that the appointment of the ALJs themselves was constitutionally invalid under the Constitution’s Article II Appointments Clause have been received favorably by some courts.  See SEC Hit with Double Whammy Rulings Barring It from Commencing Challenged Administrative Proceedings.  Others that made more fundamental challenges to the entire fairness of the administrative proceeding process have not yet gained judicial footholds.  But the disparate treatment of alleged violators in federal court and the SEC courts was so obvious, and became the focus of so much criticism, that some action was required.  See Former SEC Enforcement Leaders Urge SEC To Reform Administrative Enforcement Process.  The repeated statements by SEC Enforcement officials that the existing process was fair and provided no disadvantages to alleged violators were transparently wrong (see Ceresney Presents Unconvincing Defense of Increased SEC Administrative Prosecutions).  The Commission was forced to act when the Wall Street Journal reported on the plain advantage that the SEC had when it sent cases to its administrative court.  See Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal (credit to WSJ reporter Jean Eaglesham for playing a major role in moving the SEC toward reform).  Then, judges like N.D. Ga. Judge Leigh Martin May and SDNY Judge Richard Berman began to note in their opinions on the Appointments Clause issue that there were overall fairness issues raised that went beyond the alleged Article II violations.  Thank goodness the Commission saw that a stonewalling strategy that lasted almost two years had to be revised.

We now need to examine these proposals, and see if they adequately handle the procedural problems in the administrative court that give the SEC staff an unacceptable advantage in prosecutions that place respondents’ assets, and ability to do business and earn a living, at issue.  Not having reviewed the proposal yet, I can’t comment on the extent to which they address those problems.  But my bet is that there are at least some key advantages held by the SEC staff that are not yet addressed (since the staffers drafting the changes have been arguing for months that respondents are not really at a disadvantage).  That will be the subject of future blog posts, and, of course, what are likely to be voluminous responses during the comment period.

Straight Arrow

September 24, 2015

Contact Straight Arrow privately here, or leave a public comment below:

SEC Hit with Double Whammy Rulings Barring It from Commencing Challenged Administrative Proceedings

On the afternoon of September 17, 2015, the SEC was rebuffed by two federal courts in separate cases challenging the constitutionality of the SEC’s administrative law enforcement proceedings.  As reported here, the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit granted Lynn Tilton an order barring the SEC from proceeding with an administrative trial on charges against her, pending that court’s resolution of a dispute over whether the federal courts have jurisdiction to consider her complaint that the administrative proceeding would violate Article II of the Constitution.  At roughly the same time, New York federal district court Judge Richard Berman rejected a motion by the SEC to allow it to proceed with an administrative action against Barbara Duka while it appealed (to the Second Circuit) Judge Berman’s preliminary injunction barring that proceeding from moving forward, on the very same constitutional grounds.  Judge Berman’s preliminary injunction order can be read here: Order Issuing Preliminary Injunction in Duka v. SEC; and his order denying the SEC’s stay motion can be read here: Decision and Order in Duka v. SEC.

The result is that two more administrative proceedings are now barred by court orders, joining two others that were barred by orders of Judge Leigh May in the federal district court in Atlanta.  See Court Issues Preliminary Injunction Halting Likely Unconstitutional SEC Proceeding, and Order Enjoining SEC in Gray Financial Group v. SEC.

The Second Circuit order was brief and straightforward.  But Judge Berman’s denial of the SEC’s application for a stay is filled with meaty discussions of key issues, including reiterating that several of the SEC’s positions on jurisdiction and the merits are wrong, suggesting that the SEC plays a little fast and loose with the positions it argues, and emphasizing that the SEC might want to be more proactive in addressing allegations of potential bias in its administrative court.

Judge Richard Berman - NYLJ/Rick Kopstein 100614

Judge Richard Berman – NYLJ/Rick Kopstein

On the jurisdictional issue, Judge Berman restated his belief that his court does have jurisdiction over the Duka constitutional challenge (“The Court is, respectfully, convinced that it made the correct finding of subject matter jurisdiction,” slip op. at 3), and took the time to address the contrary position recently reached by the Seventh Circuit in Bebo v. SEC, 2015 WL 4998489 (7th Cir. Aug. 24, 2015) (see 7th Circuit Rules for SEC, Affirming Dismissal of Bebo Case on Jurisdictional Grounds).  He openly disagreed with the Seventh Circuit’s view that the Supreme Court decision in Elgin v. Dep’t. of the Treasury, 132 S. Ct. 2126 (2012), was on point because the factual circumstances differed significantly.  See slip op. at 8-9.

Judge Berman also made pointed statements elsewhere in his opinion arguing that immediate consideration of the consitutional issue was consistent with Second Circuit law and the public interest.  For example: “The SEC argues unconvincingly that a party in Ms. Duka’s shoes ‘must patiently await the denouement of proceedings within the [administrative agency],” . . . .  But Second Circuit precedent appears to refute such a notion.  See Touche Ross & Co. v. S.E.C., 609 F.2d 570, 577 (2d Cir. 1979) (‘[T]o require appellants to exhaust their administrative remedies would be to require them to submit to the very procedures which they are attacking.’).”  Slip op. at 15-16 (some cites omitted).  And: “With respect to the public interest, the Court submits that it is of the utmost importance to the public that complex constitutional questions be resolved at the outset, with finality, and by application of the expertise of the federal courts.  See, e.g., Massaro v. United States, 538 U.S. 500,504 (2003); see also Pappas v. Giuliani, 118 F. Supp. 2d 433, 442 (S.D.N.Y. 2000) affd, 290 F.3d 143 (2d Cir. 2002) (‘Although often highly competent in their designated area of law, administrative decision-makers generally have neither the training nor the experience to adjudicate complex federal constitutional issues.’); Austin v. Ford, 181 F.R.D. 283, 286 (S.D.N.Y. 1998) (‘Public interest in finality of judgment encompasses the development of decisional law, the importance of the opinion to nonparties, and the deterrence of frivolous litigation.’).”  Slip op. at 16 (some cites and footnote omitted).

All of these points could be impactful as the Second Circuit considers the same jurisdictional issue in the Tilton v. SEC appeal.

On the merits, Judge Berman restated his belief that Supreme Court case law leaves little doubt that the SEC’s administrative law judges are “inferior officers” within the meaning of that term in Article II, and, as a result, their appointments are subject to limitations in Article II’s Appointments Clause.  His finding that the High Court reasoning and holding in Freytag v. Commissioner, 501 U.S. 868 (1991), yields the conclusion that SEC ALJs are inferior officers because they exercised “significant authority pursuant to the laws of the United States” was not new – as he noted, he previously reached the same conclusion when he issued the preliminary injunction.  Slip op. at 9.  But it came within two weeks of the SEC reaching the opposite conclusion in its recent decision on the petition for review in In the Matter of Raymond J. Lucia Cos., Inc., File No. 15006 (see SEC Declares All Is Okay Because Its ALJs Are Just Employees and Not “Inferior Officers”), without even mentioning that decision or its analysis, suggesting Judge Berman found the SEC reasoning unpersuasive and sees no reason to defer to SEC views on the issue.  No doubt with knowledge of the specific analysis of the SEC in Lucia, he still wrote: “the SEC will not, in the Court’s view, be able to persuade the appellate courts that ALJs are not “inferior officers.”  Slip op. at 11.  Judge Berman’s bottom line: “Duka’s constitutional (Appointments Clause) challenge is (very) likely to succeed.”  Id. at 10.

On the SEC’s nimble willingness to revise its arguments to fit the circumstances, Judge Berman noted the “irony” of the SEC’s new-found emphasis on the compelling importance of judicial efficiency after it scoffed at Ms. Duka’s similar arguments in the original preliminary injunction hearing.  He wrote: “The Court’s reference to ‘irony’ [in an earlier ruling] refers to the fact that conservation of Duka’s resources was a core argument that she raised in objecting to participating in the SEC’s administrative proceedings prior to resolution of her constitutional challenge in federal court.  The SEC flatly opposed that argument, which it now appears firmly to embrace.”  He quoted his own statement during the oral argument that “I don’t understand why you reject that argument when Ms. Duka makes it but then at the same time in this Court you make the very same argument.”  Slip op. at 3 n.2.

And Judge Berman was surely making a point when he dwelled, without any apparent need, on the SEC’s opaque handling of publicly-disclosed evidence that its own administrative court could have a latent, or even intentional, bias in favor of the prosecution.  His opinion includes the following striking paragraph:

The Court is aware of recent allegations of undue pressure said to have been applied to an SEC ALJ to cause her to make SEC-favorable rulings.  “Lillian McEwen, who was an SEC judge from 1995 to 2007, said she came under fire from [Chief Administrative Law Judge Brenda] Murray for finding too often in favor of defendants.”  See Jean Eaglesham, SEC Wins with In-House Judges, The Wall Street Journal, May 6, 2015. . . .  And, in In the Matter of Timbervest, respondents allegedly sought to depose presiding ALJ Cameron Elliot, who was then allegedly invited by the SEC “to file by July I, 2015 an affidavit addressing whether he has had any communications or experienced any pressure similar to that alleged in the May 6, 2015 The Wall Street Journal article.”. . .  On June 9, 2015, ALJ Elliot emailed the following response: “I respectfully decline to submit the affidavit requested.”  See Jean Eagelsham, SEC Judge Declines to Submit Affidavit of No Bias, The Wall Street Journal, June 11, 2015. . . .  On July 24,2015, Chief Administrative Law Judge Murray issued an Order Redesignating Presiding Judge, designating Administrative Law Judge James E. Grimes “in place and stead of the Administrative Law Judge [ALJ Cameron Elliot] heretofore designated, to preside at the hearing in these proceedings and to perform other and related duties in accordance with the Commissioner’s Rules of Practice.”  See In the Matter of Barbara Duka, File No. 3-16349 (SEC).

During the September 16, 2015 hearing, the Court noted that it was “aware that there is some sort of flap at the SEC with respect to some of the ALJs,” that it “want[ed] to get further clarification about that matter,” and that “in this very case, [ALJ] Cameron Elliot . . . has been reassigned because he was not able or would not submit an affidavit.”. . .  While acknowledging that ALJ Elliot was removed from the Duka matter, Ms. Lin contended that “Judge Elliot has a very busy docket . . . and there is no suggestion, no connection whatsoever about [The Wall Street Journal article], about that particular former ALJ’s accusations to Judge Elliot’s reassignment in this case. . . .  And it’s not true that there would be any kind of connection.”. . .  The Court assumes that the SEC will want fully to investigate these matters.

Slip op. at 14-15 (citations omitted and emphasis added).

Apparently Judge Berman is as perplexed as yours truly when the Commission seems more insouciant than concerned in its reaction to serious public questioning of the fairness of its own administrative judicial process.  See SEC Bumbles Efforts To Figure Out How Its Own Administrative Law Judges Were Appointed; and SEC “Invites” ALJ Cameron Elliot To Provide Affidavit on Conversations “Similar” to Those Described by Former ALJ.  Indeed — although Judge Berman made no mention of this — it is downright embarrassing that 15 months ago the SEC’s General Counsel acknowledged that the Rules of Practice governing SEC administrative proceeding are archaic and need revamping and nothing has yet been done to address that issue.  See SEC Administrative Case Rules Likely Out Of Date, GC Says.  (Ms. Small said it was fair for attorneys to question whether the SEC’s rules for administrative proceedings were still appropriate, with the rules last revised “quite some time ago” when the SEC’s administrative proceedings dealt with different kinds of cases than the more complex administrative matters it now takes on or expects to take on — given the commission’s expanded authority under the Dodd-Frank Act — such as insider-trading actions.  It was “entirely reasonable to wonder” if those rules should be updated to reflect the changed situation, for instance by allowing more flexibility on current limits to trial preparation time or allowing for depositions to be taken.  “We want to make sure the process is fair and reasonable, so [changing] procedures to reflect the changes makes a lot of sense.”)

Anne Small -- SEC General Counsel

Anne Small — SEC General Counsel

When all of the dust settles on the Appointments Clause and other Article II constitutional challenges to these administrative courts, we will still be left with what every practicing securities litigator knows are vastly diminished due process rights in the SEC’s administrative courts as compared to the federal courts.  Judge Berman certainly seemed concerned about this in his opinion.  He said: “during the September 16, 2015 hearing, the SEC argued that administrative proceedings would serve the public interest because ‘it is a much faster process and it expedites the consideration and the determination of whether the underlying security violations had actually occurred and, more importantly, to impose the kind of remedy that would then help to prevent future harm.’. . .  The Court responded that ‘faster is [not] necessarily better because faster means no juries, no discovery, no declaratory relief.  In federal court you can get that . . . there’s a whole lot of protections, Ms. Duka argues, that are available in federal courts that are not available before the Commission.'”  Slip op. at 16.

If the SEC continues to be empowered to exercise effectively uncontrolled discretion over which cases are directed to the administrative courts (as a result of the expanded jurisdiction of those courts under the Dodd-Frank Act), and it continues to ignore obvious needs to modernize and balance the procedures for those proceedings to eliminate their “Star Chamber” similarities, the controversy over these actions will be unabated.

Straight Arrow

September 18, 2015

Contact Straight Arrow privately here, or leave a public comment below:

SEC Inspector General Reveals Investigation into Possible Bias of SEC ALJs

The Inspector General of the SEC issued an Interim Report on August 7, 2015 which indicated that he is in the midst of an inquiry into allegations that SEC administrative law judges may have been subjected to pressure from other in the performance of their duties.  According to the Interim Report, the “investigation was initiated on June 30, 2015, based on information provided by Erica Williams, Deputy Chief of Staff, Office of the Chair, concerning alleged potential issues of fairness and bias in the SEC’s administrative proceedings, including those introduced in the Timbervest, LLC (Timbervest) matter.”  On receipt of this information, the “OIG determined it would investigate allegations of bias on the part of Administrative Law Judges (ALJ) in the Commission’s administrative proceedings.”

The information that stirred the inquiry included the May 6, 2015 Wall Street Journal article by Jean Eaglesham, which reported that the SEC’s Division of Enforcement prevailed in about 90% of the cases sent to the SEC administrative law judges (see SEC Wins With In-House Judges: Agency prevails against around 90% of defendants when it sends cases to its administrative law judges), and a Securities Diary June 30, 2015 blog post entitled “SEC Bumbles Efforts To Figure Out How Its Own Administrative Law Judges Were Appointed.”  The Interim Report also referenced another, May 7, 2015 Securities Diary post “Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal,” which reported on the content of the May 6 Wall Street Journal article.

Ms. Williams told the OIG that “Chair Mary Jo White requested an OIG investigation of the alleged bias issue because the identified concerns could impact all ALJs and the SEC administrative proceedings.  The Interim Report can be read here: Interim Report of Investigation by SEC Office of Inspector General into Possible SEC ALJ Bias.

The Interim Report says:

The OIG reviewed the Securities Diary and WSJ news articles that Williams identified, which included the following statements attributed to former ALJ McEwen: she thought the system was slanted against defendants at times; she came under fire from Chief ALJ Murray for finding too often in favor of defendants; Chief ALJ Murray questioned McEwen’s loyalty to the SEC; McEwen retired as a result of the criticism; and SEC judges were expected to work on the assumption that “the burden was on the people who were accused to show that they didn’t do what the agency said they did.”

The Interim Report discussed an OIG interview with ALJ Cameron Elliot, who presided over the Timbervest administrative trial, and described that interview as follows:

The OIG interviewed ALJ Elliot concerning allegations of potential issues of fairness and bias in the SEC’s administrative proceedings.  Elliot denied bias during his reviews and rulings and stated that he independently made his decisions.  Concerning his decision not to provide an affidavit after being invited to do so by a Commission order, Elliot said he received the invitation to provide an affidavit from the Office of the Secretary.  He said that he informed Chief ALJ Murray of the existence of the invitation.  However, he said he adhered to the instructions in the order which requested him to “not consult with anyone at the Commission in the preparation of his affidavit concerning the substance thereof.”  Elliot said that he strictly followed those instructions and that he informed Chief ALJ Murray of the existence of the instructions.  At an office meeting, he informed everyone in the Office of ALJ that he had responded to the order.  When asked, Elliot said he did not receive any direction or guidance from anyone, including Chief ALJ Murray, on how he should respond to the invitation.  Elliot said he had declined to provide an affidavit, stating he had “multiple reasons why [he] decided not to provide a response” but declined to provide any of those reasons to the OIG.  Furthermore, Elliot denied being influenced by anyone on “how to decide [his] cases or suggest or make [him] biased in any fashion.”

The OIG also interviewed ALJ Brenda Murray, who “denied influencing matters before the ALJs and explained that she is responsible only for assigning the ALJs’ workload.”  She also “stated that there was no merit to the allegations of bias as alleged in the WSJ article.”

Regarding the status of the investigation, the OIG reports that it “remains ongoing,” and it “is still gathering additional facts and completing investigative steps, and new information will be reported accordingly.”  At this point, however, “the OIG has not developed any evidence to support the allegations of bias in ALJs’ decisions in the Commission’s administrative proceedings.”

It is troubling, however, that there is no reference to any effort to interview former ALJ Lillian McEwen, who made the troubling statements to the Wall Street Journal.  Ms. McEwen later reportedly said that she would be willing to be interviewed on this matter by the Commissioners.  It is important for the OIG to lay out precisely what efforts have been made to flesh out her views on this issue before issuing any clean bill of health for the SEC’s administrative process.

In addition, the statistics showing an unusually high success rate for the Enforcement Division should be confirmed or rejected through a thorough analysis, and if a statistically significant higher success rate is found for administrative proceedings over the Division’s federal court prosecutions, it is essential that the OIG make every effort to determine that the source of that differential is not, even in part, attributable to inherent biases in either the ALJs themselves or the process they use to reach their results.  Anything short of this will not put the serious due process and fairness issues to rest.  The courts — including the Supreme Court in a key employment discrimination case this past term — often accept that a statistically provable disparate impact can provide evidence of underlying concerns.  That is certainly not a precise analogy for what may be happening here, but if there is a compelling statistical case (and a 90% win rate, or even 100% for some judges, suggests there may be), it should not be ignored.

This being said, it is encouraging that Chair Mary Jo White has seen fit to cause this inquiry to occur.  The apparent determination not to make the existence of the inquiry public is a little perplexing, given the publicity surrounding the accusations.  Nevertheless, she should get credit where it is due.  Those facing prosecution in a possibly biased forum argue, however, that it is not enough to turn to an in-house IG to investigate possible in-house bias.  Lynn Tilton, who is challenging the constitutionality of her administrative enforcement action, tweeted in response: “This defendant feels no comfort that the SEC’s Internal IG investigates bias by its own Judges in its own Courts.”  This skepticism that the SEC’s IG can perform a truly independent investigation must be met by an investigative process so thorough and informed that it is beyond reproach.

Straight Arrow

August 10, 2015

Contact Straight Arrow privately here, or leave a public comment below:

SEC ALJ Cameron Elliot Declines To Submit Affidavit “Invited” by the Commission

On June 4, 2015, we discussed the SEC’s Order in In the Matter of Timbervest LLC “inviting”  administrative Law judge Cameron Elliot to submit an affidavit “addressing whether he has had any communications or experienced any pressure similar to that alleged in the May 6, 2015 The Wall Street Journal article, ‘SEC Wins With In-House Judges,’ and whether he is aware of any specific instances in which any other Commission ALJ has had such communications or experienced such pressure.”  See SEC “Invites” ALJ Cameron Elliot To Provide Affidavit on Conversations “Similar” to Those Described by Former ALJ.  Well, ALJ Elliot either doesn’t think that fits his job description, or he just doesn’t like the idea of providing a sworn declaration to the SEC.  On June 9, after considering the matter for four days, he tersely declined the invitation, saying only “I respectfully decline to submit the affidavit requested.”  (This does suggest that, at least as to this ALJ, the President or his proxies at the Commission do not have much sway over an ALJ who has multiple layers of protection against being fired.)

That would seem to leave the SEC in a bit of a pickle.  The Commissioners obviously thought there would be some value in gathering information on the issue of pressure on ALJs to act favorably to the Commission, which was raised by former ALJ Lillian McEwen with Wall Street Journal reporter Jean Eaglesham.  See Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal.  The invitation to ALJ Elliot to supply data specific to him has now been rejected.  The Commission apparently still has not acted on respondent Timbervest’s request for discovery on the issue.  So what next step can the Commission take that doesn’t smack of arbitrarily ignoring the question, even after acknowledging it could be relevant?  We can only wait and see.  The Wall Street Journal reported that in a recent interview, Ms. McEwen explained that a sitting SEC judge would have difficulty discussing whether he or she felt pressure to favor the SEC, but that she said “she would ‘of course’ be happy to give evidence about her own experience” to the commissioners “if the agency decided to ask her for that.”  See SEC Judge Declines to Submit Affidavit of No Bias.

We’ve called for the Commission to commence an open, independent, and transparent inquiry into what is now at least a potential appearance of bias in its administrative process.  If that kind of review is occurring, it certainly is not open and transparent to interested observers.  The outward appearance is that there is a strange paralysis on the issue.  The longer the silence prevails, the more the appearance of this being a real issue has a chance to develop.  With the courts now for the first time showing a willingness to scrutinize the SEC administrative law process in response to challenges raised by respondents (see Court Issues Preliminary Injunction Halting Likely Unconstitutional SEC Proceeding), paralysis — or stonewalling, if that’s what it is — would seem to encourage continued chaos.  (Speaking of chaos, doesn’t it seem a little strange that in the wake of Judge May’s decision in Hill v. SEC that the appointment of ALJ James Grimes violated the constitution’s appointments clause, the SEC has taken no steps to address that issue?  Instead, following Judge May’s ruling, ALJ Grimes was appointed to preside over a new proceeding: see Order Scheduling Hearing and Designating Presiding Judge in In the Matter of R. Scott Peden.)

Straight Arrow

June 11, 2015

Contact Straight Arrow privately here, or leave a public comment below:

SEC Broadens Constitutional Inquiry into Its Own Administrative Judges in Timbervest Case

On May 27, 2015, the SEC agreed to expand its own consideration of constitutionality challenges to its administrative law adjudicative process.  It issued an order asking for further briefing on whether the appointment of its administrative law judges conforms to the Constitution’s Appointments Clause.  The order, which was issued in the administrative proceeding In the Matter of Timbervest LLC et al., File No. 3-15519, is laid out below.  We previously discussed the briefing of constitutional issues before the SEC in the Timbervest case here: Briefing of ALJ Constitutionality Before SEC Leaves Resolution in Doubt.

This new development was set in motion by the May 7, 2015 Wall Street Journal article by Jean Eaglesham reporting on questions being raised about the fairness and constitutionality of the SEC’s use of its own administrative courts to prosecute securities enforcement actions for severe penalties, especially against people who were not otherwise subject to SEC regulatory oversight.  See Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal.  Among other things, that article quoted a former SEC administrative law judge about pressure that had been placed on her to favor the SEC in her rulings.  That revelation spurred respondents in SEC actions to seek further information from the SEC about possible bias or other taints to the SEC’s administrative law proceedings.  In the proceeding In the Matter of Charles L. Hill, Jr., administrative law judge James Grimes approved a subpoena to the SEC staff for the production of documents relating to the matters discussed in the Wall Street Journal article.  See SEC ALJ James Grimes Issues Important Discovery Order Against SEC.  The respondents in the Timbervest proceeding, which is now under review by the Commission itself after an Initial Decision against the respondents by ALJ Cameron Elliot, also asked for discovery into the matters raised in the WSJ article in a filing that can be read here: Respondents’ Motion To Allow Submission of Additional Evidence and Motion for Leave To Adduce Additional Evidence.  That led to the May 27 SEC order:

On May 20, 2015, Respondents filed a Motion to Allow Submission of Additional Evidence and for Leave to Adduce Additional Evidence.  Based on that motion, the Respondents now appear to be asserting that the manner of appointment of the administrative law judges who presided over this matter violates the Appointments Clause of the Constitution.

The Commission’s consideration of the Appointments Clause challenge would be assisted by the submission of additional material for inclusion in the record and by the submission of additional briefing.

Accordingly, it is ORDERED that the Division of Enforcement shall by June 4, 2015 file and serve on the parties an affidavit from an appropriate Commission staff member, with supporting exhibits if appropriate, setting forth the manner in which ALJ Cameron Elliot and Chief ALJ Brenda Murray were hired, including the method of selection and appointment.

It is further ORDERED that the parties shall file simultaneous supplemental briefs . . . limited to the following two issues: (1) whether, assuming solely for the sake of argument that the Commission’s ALJs are “inferior officers” within the meaning of Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 of the Constitution, their manner of appointment violates the Appointments Clause; and (2) the appropriate remedy if such a violation is found.

In a footnote, the Commission said it was not yet deciding the Timbervest motion, including “the materiality of the discovery sought.”  The order in its entirety can be found here: Order Requesting Additional Submissions and Additional Briefing.

The SEC is treading carefully here.  We know, of course, that there is no chance the Commission will rule that its own administrative proceedings are unconstitutional in any respect, but Mary Jo White is a good enough lawyer to know she has to make a record that will not undercut the appearance of fairness in this entire process, or suggest any SEC bias in its own favor.  Just saying that shows how absurd the process is: the SEC is obviously conflicted in considering whether the prosecutions it sent to its administrative judges are unconstitutional.  That, among other reasons, is why this issue needs to be thrashed out fully before actual Article III judges in Article III courts.  Nevertheless, federal district court judges, with one exception, have ruled they lack the jurisdiction to consider the issue.  See Court Dismisses “Compelling and Meritorious” Bebo Constitutional Claims Solely on Jurisdictional Grounds; SEC Wins First Skirmish on Constitutional Challenge to Chau Administrative Proceeding.  The one exception led to a decision in the SEC’s favor that lacked the substance to serve as a compelling precedent: see In Duka v. SEC, SDNY Judge Berman Finds SEC Administrative Law Enforcement Proceedings Constitutional in a Less than Compelling Opinion.

The revelation of possible pressure on SEC ALJs to favor the SEC would be a game-changer if it is substantiated.  That introduces new elements of due process and fundamental fairness concerns beyond the separation of powers and appointments clause issues that have been the focus of most of the challenges to date.  How the Commission could question the “materiality” of that information is hard to fathom.  As we previously wrote, the only appropriate response to such a “red flag” is to commence a fully independent review of issue.  That is, of course, what the SEC would demand if a similar event were to occur in a public company, in order to avoid a later charge by the SEC and its staff of “reckless disregard” of “red flags.”  But apparently different rules govern the Commission, which seems to be placing itself above the law.

Straight Arrow

May 28, 2015

Contact Straight Arrow privately here, or leave a public comment below:

Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal

If you haven’t read Jean Eaglesham’s article in the May 7, 2015 Wall Street Journal about the SEC’s administrative enforcement prosecutions, you should.  SEC Wins With In-House Judges: Agency prevails against around 90% of defendants when it sends cases to its administrative law judge sheds new light on what is increasingly being recognized as an abusive use of the SEC’s captive administrative law courts to prosecute complex securities enforcement cases and impose debilitating life-changing penalties without giving respondents a fair shake.  Ms. Eaglesham centers her piece around the ongoing SEC administrative action against Timbervest LLC and its officers, which happens to be the case discussed just yesterday in the Securities Diary Straight Arrow blog: Briefing of ALJ Constitutionality Before SEC Leaves Resolution in Doubt.

The article points out that the SEC has not so mysteriously increased its use of the administrative courts in apparent response to losing more cases in its federal court enforcement actions.  (The SEC’s Director of the Division of Enforcement admitted that they chose a forum based on the desire to win and to pressure their targets into settlement.)  The federal court actions allow the accused to present a defense to real folks, not administrative judges, who happen to be chosen by, work within, and report to, the SEC itself.  (Ms. Eaglesham quotes Judge Jed Rakoff: “The SEC appoints the judges, the SEC pays the judges, they are subject to appeal to the SEC.  That can create an appearance issue, even if the judges are excellent, as I have every reason to believe they are.”)  There are no standards that cabin SEC discretion to choose when it can deprive an accused of a jury trial simply by choosing to use the administrative court.  This presents obvious Seventh Amendment issues, as well as arbitrariness issues under the Administrative Procedure Act, that no court has yet addressed.  Indeed, the SEC is actively trying to prevent federal courts from addressing these issues, and so far has been successful.

Ms. Eaglesham also reports, to my knowledge for the first time, about internal pressures on SEC administrative law judges to side with the SEC or be accused of a lack of “loyalty”:

One former SEC judge said she thought the system was slanted against defendants at times. Lillian McEwen, who was an SEC judge from 1995 to 2007, said she came under fire from Ms. Murray for finding too often in favor of defendants.

“She questioned my loyalty to the SEC,” Ms. McEwen said in an interview, adding that she retired as a result of the criticism.

Ms. McEwen said the SEC in-house judges were expected to work on the assumption that “the burden was on the people who were accused to show that they didn’t do what the agency said they did.”

This is a grave charge that needs independent investigation.  If true, it would raise serious due process issues.  It certainly provides sufficient grounds for the SEC to be subjected to discovery in a federal court action seeking to prevent the SEC from imposing sanctions in a court infected with inherent bias, if the SEC’s efforts to prevent such an action from going forward can be overcome.

Ms. Eaglesham has done us a service by exposing the SEC’s festering sore to the open air.  We can only hope that a little sunlight will penetrate the SEC’s defensive shell and allow a full and fair consideration of the serious issues being raised.

Straight Arrow

May 7, 2015

Contact Straight Arrow privately here, or leave a public comment below: