Tag Archives: Judge Richard Berman

SEC Gambit To Avoid Judge May in Timbervest Case Seems To Have Failed

We previously wrote about the SEC’s desperate effort to avoid the assignment of Timbervest, LLC v. SEC, Civil Action No. 1:15-CV-2106 (N.D. Ga.), to District Judge Leigh Martin May.  See SEC, Desperate To Avoid Judge May, Challenges Related Case Designation in Timbervest Action and SEC Argues Common “Facts” Are Not Common “Issues of Fact” — I Kid You Not.  You recall that Judge May ruled in Hill v. SEC that the appointment of SEC ALJ James Grimes violated the appointments clause of Article II of the Constitution — see Court Issues Preliminary Injunction Halting Likely Unconstitutional SEC Proceeding.

Well, it appears that the SEC’s motion challenging the “related case” assignment of the Timbervest action to Judge May failed.  There is no order in the docket denying the motion, but a recent scheduling order issued by Judge May suggests she will continue to preside over the case.  See Timbervest v. SEC Scheduling Order.  In the Order, Judge May states that the SEC must respond to plaintiffs’ Motion for a Temporary Restraining Order and/or Preliminary Injunction by June 29, plaintiffs must file a reply brief by July 16, and “the parties will attend a hearing in this matter a hearing” on July 21, in Courtroom 2107.  Courtroom 2107 is listed in the N.D. Georgia directory as Judge May’s courtroom.

In the meantime, in the SEC administrative case brought against Gray Financial Group, In the Matter of Gray Financial Group, Inc. et al., File No. 3-16554, SEC ALJ Cameron Elliot declined to issue a stay of proceedings in response to an unopposed motion founded on the pending federal action for injunctive relief by Gray Financial in the same Georgia federal court, which was also assigned to Judge May.  He said: “Commission Rule of Practice 161 instructs that I ‘should adhere to a policy of strongly disfavoring’ stay requests unless ‘the requesting party makes a strong showing that the denial of the request or motion would substantially prejudice their case.’  17 C.F.R. § 201.161(b)(1).  Respondents have not made such a showing.  I will abide by an injunction if it is issued; however, as of now I have been instructed to resolve this proceeding within 300 days of service of the OIP.”  See Order Denying Unopposed Motion To Stay Administrative Proceeding Against Gray Financial Group.

So, chaos still reigns, and apparently the SEC is unsure about how best to bring it under control.  See SEC Rejects Easy Answers To Admin Court Challenges.  In that article, Law 360’s Stephanie Russell-Kraft reported on a discussion between Judge Richard Berman and a DOJ lawyer representing the SEC.  Judge Berman asked whether, in light of comments by Judge May that it might be easy to cure the appointments clause violation, the similar claims brought before him by Barbara Duka (in Duka v. SEC) could be resolved simply by having the Commission reappoint its current ALJs.  The DOJ lawyer declined to address whether that could be done, leading to the following colloquy:

“Is the commission opposed to an easy fix?” Judge Berman asked.

“The Department of Justice is very actively considering the best litigation approach to address this issue,” Lin answered.

“I’m asking you if [appointing the judges] would solve this issue,” Judge Berman pressed, pointing out that the case pending before him had nothing to do with the SEC’s litigation strategy.

“It’s not like if we pursue one of these options this case or other cases will go away,” Lin answered, adding that changing the way it appoints its judges is not a “meaningful way” to address Judge May’s decisions or a “practical way” for it to approach its long-standing administrative court scheme.

“The commission has to consider all the cases it has,” she said later, to which Judge Berman replied, “I don’t.”

Meanwhile, the SEC’s administrative proceeding against Laurie Bebo continues to be tried, even while the appeal of Ms. Bebo’s injunctive action moves forward in the Seventh Circuit.

The ship is plainly adrift.

Straight Arrow

June 23, 2015

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SEC Says It Will Appeal Hill v. SEC Decision, Seek To Stay the Case, and Try To Prevent Discovery

An SEC June 15, 2015 filing in Hill v. SEC, No. 15-cv-1801 (N.D. Ga.), informed Judge Leigh Martin May that the Commission will appeal her June 8 ruling that the administrative proceeding In the Matter of Charles L. Hill, Jr. violates the constitution because the appointment of the presiding administrative law judge, James Grimes, was unconstitutional.  See Court Issues Preliminary Injunction Halting Likely Unconstitutional SEC Proceeding.  The SEC also said it would seek a stay of the entire proceeding before Judge May, including any discovery the plaintiff intends to pursue as the Hill action moves beyond the preliminary injunction stage.  The SEC’s submission can be read here: SEC June 15 Filing in Hill v. SECThe submission on behalf of plaintiff Charles Hill can be read here: Hill June 15 Filing in Hill v. SEC.

These submissions were made in response to the portion of the June 8 ruling stating that the parties should “confer on a timetable for conducting discovery and briefing the remaining issues.”

Although Judge May’s preliminary injunction was narrowly drawn to halt only the single administrative action against Mr. Hill — and ALJ Grimes has since been appointed to preside over a new proceeding — the SEC still argues that the requirements for staying the Hill Order and litigation are satisfied.  The SEC wrote: “Defendant intends to appeal the preliminary injunction issued by this Court.  Defendant also intends to move to stay all proceedings in this Court pending appeal because the Eleventh Circuit’s ruling will have a significant impact on this case, and any further proceedings in this Court could prove largely superfluous and a waste of the parties’ and the Court’s resources.”  SEC Submission at 1-2.  Typically, however, the mere possibility of some wasted resources in the event of a reversal on appeal is insufficient to support a stay of proceedings.  Such a motion normally requires a showing that in the absence of a stay the status quo could be sufficiently altered that the moving party could suffer irreparable harm.  Because Judge May’s order does not go beyond the one proceeding, and the only harm to the SEC of the litigation going forward during the appeal would relate to discovery in the case itself, obtaining a stay should be an uphill battle.

Perhaps recognizing this, the SEC’s backup plan apparently is to slow play the Hill litigation.  It argued that if a stay is not issued, there is no urgency to resolve the matter.  Instead, the normal schedule for a civil action in the Northern District of Georgia should prevail: “There is no good cause for Plaintiff’s request that the parties begin discovery immediately.  First, this Court has already issued a preliminary injunction, and thus, there is no urgency for Plaintiff to proceed faster than the normal pace set by the Federal Rules and the Local Rules [under which] the government is entitled to have until July 20, 2015, to file its answer or other response to Plaintiff’s Amended Complaint.  There is no reason that the government should be deprived of the usual time that the Federal Rules provide for responding to the Amended Complaint nor that issues regarding whether discovery is warranted need to be resolved before the government has had that opportunity.  Moreover, under Local Rule 26.2(A), the discovery period does not commence until ‘thirty (30) days after the appearance of the first defendant by answer.'”  Id. at 2.

The SEC also said that plaintiff had not indicated the nature of discovery he intended to pursue, and argued that “no discovery is necessary because all of Plaintiff’s claims involve pure issues of law,” the “case can be resolved on dispositive motions without any factual development,” and “to the extent any facts are necessary, Plaintiff already has them in his possession.”  Id. at 2-3.  Accordingly, the SEC asks “that the Court should decide the case without permitting discovery.”  Id. at 3.

Plaintiff Charles Hill presented a different proposal.  After noting that counsel for the parties conferred “on multiple occasions” without reaching agreement on a proposed schedule, he proposed, without argument, simply that discovery begin “immediately,” end “90 days after Defendant files an answer, or, if Defendant files a Motion to Dismiss, 90 days after the Court denies the Motion to Dismiss,” and the deadline for motions for summary judgment be “30 days after the close of discovery.”  He presented no argument why the schedule should depart from local rules.

The best result probably lies somewhere between the two proposals.  The SEC’s notion that this should be treated as just another ordinary case seems a little tone-deaf, and strangely out of sync with the expectation that whatever the result, the Commission should want to avoid extending the period during which there is a cloud over its administrative proceedings.  It certainly seems in the public interest to expedite a case of this nature, and try to move quickly to a final result, while allowing the parties ample time to address complex issues.  On the other hand, it is the rare case that moves “immediately” to discovery when there is no pending deadline that causes the parties and the court to need to reach a quick result.  And the SEC has a point that the nature of discovery needed is unclear with respect to the appointments clause issue because the facts of ALJ Grimes’s appointment appear not to be in dispute.  (Although there could be a need for discovery or development of expert testimony on the equitable factors bearing on whether an injunction should issue, and, if so, what its scope should be.)  The same may not be true for the other Article II issue raised in the complaint — the alleged invalidity of the double layer of “for cause” protection for SEC ALJs against removal by the President — as to which Judge May’s opinion did not address the merits.  It is also not clear whether plaintiff will try to seek discovery on the two other theories in the complaint — the alleged improper delegation of legislative authority to SEC ALJs, and the denial of a 7th Amendment jury right — which Judge May found were not likely to succeed on the merits.

In any event, whether any discovery is appropriate, and if so what it would encompass, is not really a scheduling issue.  If the plaintiff wants to pursue discovery and the SEC objects, that dispute can be raised with the court.

The inability of the parties to reach a reasonable compromise on scheduling leaves it up to Judge May to decide what she believes is reasonable under these circumstances.  That probably should be something that allows the case to move forward expeditiously, but not quite at the breakneck pace Mr. Hill is suggesting.

In the meantime, as reported in Law 360 (SEC To Appeal District Judge’s Admin Court Injunction) the SEC informed Judge Richard Berman in a letter to the court in Duka v. SEC “that the agency has no plans to change the way it appoints its judges while it waits for the solicitor general to approve the appeal to the Eleventh Circuit it was not considering an effort to cure the appointments clause violation found by Judge May.”  The letter supports this position because “the SEC has over 100 litigated proceedings at various stages of the administrative process and the ALJ scheme has been in use for seven decades and is grounded in a highly-regulated competitive service system that Congress created for the selection, hiring and appointment of ALJs in the executive branch.”  That suggests that it may not be as straightforward as Judge May speculated that the appointments clause violation might be easily cured.

Straight Arrow

June 16, 2015

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SEC Strengthens Appointments Clause Challenge to ALJs by Admitting It Was Not Responsible for at Least One ALJ Appointment

Court filings indicate that the SEC made a significant admission relevant to the constitutionality of its administrative law court during a hearing in the case brought by Lynn Tilton to enjoin the administrative proceeding brought against her.  A letter sent to Judge Richard Berman, who is presiding over the similar action brought by Barbara Duka, Duka v. SEC, No. 15-cv-357 (SDNY), lays out what happened with a quote from a hearing transcript in Tilton v. SEC, No. 5-cv-02472 (SDNY). The letter was sent by the Justice Department, and it lays out the parties’ positions on the significance of what occurred in the Tilton case.  (You can read a copy here: Letter to Judge Berman in Duka v. SEC.

The letter quotes relevant portions of the hearing in the Tilton case before Judge Ronnie Abram, in which counsel for the SEC admitted that the administrative law judge in the administrative action brought against Ms. Tilton, Carol Foelak, was not appointed by the SEC Commissioners, and that this strengthens the argument that, as to at least cases before that judge, SEC proceedings may violate the Appointments Clause in Article II on the Constitution.  That clause states:

[The President] shall nominate, and, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.

This would appear to mandate that “inferior Officers” of the United States may be appointed, with Congress’s approval, only by the President, the Courts of Law, or “the Heads of Departments.”  The only way that could be satisfied as to the SEC ALJs (if they are “inferior Officers”) is if the SEC Commissioners are a “Head of Department” and they make the appointments of their ALJs.

Here is the quoted portion of that hearing transcript:

THE COURT: Can I ask you the factual question that I asked of Mr. Gunther? Who exactly appoints SEC ALJs? Can you tell me more about the appointment process?

MS. LIN: Your Honor, those facts are not in the record here, but we acknowledge that the commissioners were not the ones who appointed, in this case, ALJ [Foelak], who is the ALJ presiding –

THE COURT: There is no factual dispute, okay.

THE COURT: Let me just back up for a minute and ask you a question. If I find that the ALJs are inferior officers, do you necessarily lose?

MS. LIN: We acknowledge that, your Honor, if this Court were to find ALJ [Foelak] to be an inferior officer, that that would make it more likely that the plaintiffs can succeed on the merits for the Article II challenge, at least with respect to the appointments clause challenge.

In the letter to Judge Berman, Ms. Duka argues “this the first time the SEC has ever acknowledged that SEC Commissioners do not appoint SEC ALJs in some or all administrative proceedings” (emphasis in original), and seeks to amend her complaint to add an Appointments Clause violation as grounds for the injunctive relief she seeks.  She also argues that in his previous decision denying a preliminary injunction, Judge Berman wrote “[t]he Supreme Court’s decision in Freytag v. Commissioner, 501 U.S. 868 (1991) … would appear to support the conclusion that SEC ALJs are also inferior officers,” and the “[b]ased on SEC’s admissions,” a ruling to that effect “would mean that Plaintiff is likely to succeed on the merits of her claim.”  See In Duka v. SEC, SDNY Judge Berman Finds SEC Administrative Law Enforcement Proceedings Constitutional in a Less than Compelling Opinion.

 The SEC consented to the amendment of the complaint, but argued that its ALJs are “not Constitutional officers, and therefore the Appointments Clause is not applicable,” and that the amendment should not be grounds for new briefing of the motion for preliminary injunction.

As noted in an earlier blog post, the SEC itself asked for briefing on the Appointments Clause issue in its review of the Iniital Decision in In the Matter of Timbervest, LLC.  See SEC Broadens Constitutional Inquiry into Its Own Administrative Judges in Timbervest Case.

Straight Arrow

June 1, 2015

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