Tag Archives: related case

SEC Argues Common “Facts” Are Not Common “Issues of Fact” — I Kid You Not

Yesterday, we described the SEC’s desperate attempt to nullify the assignment of the case Timbervest, LLC v. SEC to Judge Leigh Martin May.  That was based on the argument that the other cases already before Judge May identified as “related cases,” Hill v. SEC and Gray Financial Group v. SEC, were not actually “related cases” because “the cases do not ‘involve the same issue of fact,’” and they “do not arise out of the same event or transaction.”  See SEC, Desperate To Avoid Judge May, Challenges Related Case Designation in Timbervest Action.  Timbervest argued this was wrong because “they all arise out of the same facts concerning how SEC administrative law judges (‘ALJs’) are hired and what authority and powers SEC ALJs possess,” and the factual differences in the underlying SEC allegations in each case have no bearing on the constitutional issues raised in the respective complaints in these actions.

Today, the SEC filed its response.  It can be read here: SEC reply in opposition to related case designation.  It acknowledges that the cases have some common “facts” but argues that common “facts” are not common “issues of fact.”  In the SEC’s words, “At best, Plaintiffs’ argument boils down to the contention that these cases involve some of the same ‘facts,’ rather than ‘issues of fact.’”  The SEC’s argument turns on the assertion, made without citation, that an “issue of fact” must be a “dispute of fact,” and because the SEC will not dispute the common “facts” in these cases, they cannot be considered “issues of fact” because they will be undisputed.  (“their arguments ignore the distinction between a mere ‘fact’ and an ‘issue of fact,’ i.e., a dispute of fact”).  The best the SEC can do to support this view is a cite to Black’s Law Dictionary, which is quoted as saying: “An ‘issue of fact’ is ‘[a] point supported by one party’s evidence and controverted by another’s.'”  I don’t have a copy of Black’s Law Dictionary handy, but I guarantee you this purported definition had nothing to do with the assignment of cases to district court judges.

I have to chuckle.  No wonder lawyers are not often trusted by ordinary folks.  They concoct these arguments whether they make sense or not.  What ordinary person out there would think that two paragraphs with identical facts would not have the same “issues of fact”?  In any case, that doesn’t really matter here because it is patently obvious that in the context at issue here — how to assign a newly-filed case — a court (actually, a clerk of court) cannot possibly apply the standard the SEC passionately espouses because there is no way to determine at that stage which “facts” will or will not be “disputed.”  At this stage, there is only one source that can be used to assign the case — the allegations in the complaint.  If the allegations in the complaint involve factual contentions that materially overlap the facts alleged in another pending case, then the “related case” designation should be appropriate.  Last I checked, no clerk of court sought input from the defendant in an action about what factual allegations would be disputed before making a “related case” assignment.  Got a cite for that, SEC?

I wonder whether, having made this cute argument, the SEC will argue against being judicially estopped from disputing any of the facts alleged in the complaint when it files its Answer.  SEC counsel has now represented there are no material “disputed” facts, right?

I also wonder what Judge May is thinking about all of these machinations conjured up by the SEC solely to avoid having her preside over the Timbervest complaint?  If she has a sense of humor, she’ll chuckle as well, and move on to the job of deciding whether the few important facts that differ between Timbervest v. SEC and Hill v. SEC — which involve the different status of the respective administrative actions when the complaints were filed — alters the jurisdictional analysis in her Hill opinion.

Straight Arrow

June 18, 2015

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SEC, Desperate To Avoid Judge May, Challenges Related Case Designation in Timbervest Action

The SEC really wants to avoid Judge Leigh Martin May — the Northern District of Georgia judge who ruled in Hill v. SEC that the appointment of SEC ALJ James Grimes violated the appointments clause of Article II of the Constitution — like the plague.  The Commission filed a motion in Timbervest, LLC v. SEC seeking nullification of the assignment of the Timbervest action to Judge May as a case related to Hill v. SEC because it does not properly fit the definition of a “related case.”  The Timbervest complaint was filed after another case in that district making the same constitutional argument, Gray Financial Group v. SEC, was reassigned to Judge May as a related case.  See Timbervest Files Complaint and TRO Motion To Halt SEC Proceeding.  Timbervest identified it as a case related to Hill and Gray Financial in the cover sheet for its complaint, and the Timbervest action was assigned to Judge May, but the SEC’s papers do not address the actual process and rationale leading to the assignment of the case to Judge May.  Instead, the SEC accused Timbervest of “judge shopping” by checking the “related case” box.  By all appearances, however, it is the SEC that is “judge shopping” with this motion — shopping for any N.D. Ga. judge other than Judge Leigh Martin May.

The SEC’s motion can be read here: SEC motion opposing related case designation in Timbervest case.  Plaintiff’s response can be read here: Plaintiff’s response to SEC reassignment motion in Timbervest.

The SEC’s argument is that cases are “related” for purposes of judicial assignment in the Northern District of Georgia only if they arise out of common facts (“Plaintiffs noted the supposed relationship between their case, on the one hand, and Hill and Gray on the other, by checking a box on their civil cover sheet allowing for the designation of cases as related if they ‘involve the same issue of fact or arise[] out of the same event or transaction included in an earlier numbered pending suit.’”)  But, the SEC argues, the court’s Internal Operating Procedures establish that “a case is NOT related if it has the same LEGAL issue. . . .”  (quoting Rule 905-2(a)).  The SEC contends that Hill, Gray Financial, and Timbervest all present a common legal issue about the validity of the appointment of ALJs, but they arise out of very different facts (i.e., the SEC’s factual contentions of law violations are different in each case): “the cases do not arise out of the same event or transaction. To the contrary, the cases arise out of different administrative proceedings involving different respondents.”

This argument conflates the facts relevant to the SEC’s charges in the administrative cases with those relevant to the plaintiffs’ complaints pending before the district court.  Each of these cases — that is, each of the federal court complaints — turn on essentially identical facts about the appointments of, powers granted to, and removal limitations for, the ALJs presiding over the proceedings.  The critical facts at issue are not the underlying violations of law charged by the SEC, but the nearly identical facts surrounding the appointment of the ALJs assigned to hear the three administrative cases, the President’s control (or lack thereof) over those ALJs, and the powers they exercise as ALJs.

In fact, the SEC itself previously argued to Judge May that the only relevant facts in the Hill case are the circumstances of the appointment of ALJ James Grimes (see SEC Says It Will Appeal Hill v. SEC Decision, Seek To Stay the Case, and Try To Prevent Discovery).  Since the Timbervest complaint alleges that the same circumstances apply to the appointment of ALJ Cameron Elliot, who presided over the Timbervest administrative trial, the SEC should be in agreement that the material issues in each of those cases “involve the same issue of fact.” 

But putting aside the merits of the SEC’s argument, it is difficult to understand why the SEC cares about whether the Timbervest case is assigned to the same or a different judge than the Hill and Gray Financial cases.  The SEC already informed Judge May that it will be appealing her preliminary injunction order to the 11th Circuit.  See SEC Says It Will Appeal Hill v. SEC Decision, Seek To Stay the Case, and Try To Prevent Discovery.  Given the fact that this issue is going up on appeal no matter what, why make a desperate motion to reassign a case turning on what is acknowledged to be an identical legal issue to another judge in the same district?  The legal issue is going to be heard de novo by the court of appeals; there is little or no value in trying to force another judge to labor on another opinion.  And even if the case were reassigned, the strong likelihood is that a different judge in the same district would defer to Judge May’s opinion — which, whether ultimately right or wrong, is thoughtful and certainly not off the wall — rather than labor through the complex analysis again, knowing that the 11th Circuit will be ruling soon in any event.

So, even putting aside the questionable legal arguments made by the Commission, the problem with this motion to reassign the Timbervest case is that it just doesn’t make a lot of tactical, strategic, or common sense.  The filing of the motion, together with a bevy of other questionable recent decisions made by the Commission on the issues raised over the last year about the SEC’s administrative enforcement practices, leaves the impression that very little thought is being given to an overall plan for dealing with what is plainly an important problem.  (Three examples come immediately to mind: the publication without hearings or comment of slapdash and plainly meaningless guidelines for bringing cases administratively, which have been roundly ridiculed by commentators; the recent debacle where the Commission asked ALJ Elliot for an affidavit on bias issues and Mr. Elliot declined to do so; and the Commission’s apparent paralysis in responding to remarks by former ALJ Lillian McEwen about possible systemic biases in the administrative court.)  See Upon Further Review, SEC Memo on Use of Administrative Courts Was Indeed a Fumble; SEC ALJ Cameron Elliot Declines To Submit Affidavit “Invited” by the Commission; and Fairness Concerns About Proliferation of SEC Administrative Prosecutions Documented by Wall Street Journal.

Most everything the SEC is doing now with these cases, and on the critical issues raised by the Commission’s increased use of administrative enforcement actions, seems without rhyme or reason.  The Commission and its staff need to sit back, take a deep breath, and figure out how to get to a resolution of these serious concerns with minimal chaos and upheaval, both in the courts and in its own administrative court.  Right now, that is just not happening, and the resulting turmoil is saddening and a bit frightening.

Straight Arrow

June 17, 2015

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